email: tony@lathes.co.uk
Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted
Machine Tool Manuals   Catalogues   Belts   Books  Accessories

Early HARRISON 13-Inch Lathe
A manual is available for this lathe
Flat-belt Drive L2   An Original L5
Harrison Home Page   L5 Early Model   Later L5 9" & L5A 11-inch"   140   
L5 Accessories   
10-inch   Late 10" & 12" L6   Early 12" L6     Late L6 Mk. 3   
13" & 15" Late Models    13"   14"   16"   17"    Hydraulic Copy Lathes
Harrison Union Lathes   Models 155 and 165   Model 190
14", 16" & 17" Accessories
Newer Models
:
AA-10 VS  VS330 & AA   M250   M300   M350 & 390   M400   M450   M500       




Not merely a 12-inch model with a slightly increased capacity, the 13-inch Harrison was an almost completely different design - albeit one that was styled in the familiar "round" fashion of the 1950s and so closely resembling both the smaller and larger machines in the maker's range. Found badged as a "Clearing" in The U.S.A. and Canada (and possibly in other markets, too) the lathe was usually fitted with a 3 h.p. single-speed motor and had nine speeds available from the clutched and braked all-geared headstock: these could be ordered as a slow set, 35 to 750 rpm, or at no extra cost, 59 to 1250 rpm. However, a two-speed 2.5/5 hp motor was available and, when so equipped, the lathe had 18 speeds from 41 to 1750 rpm.
Bored to pass a 1.625 inch diameter bar the spindle ran in the usual Harrison arrangement of opposed Timken pre-loaded taper roller bearings at the front and a single-row ball race at the rear; it was fitted with an American type L0 nose - thankfully without the option of a threaded fitting. The main double gear that slid along the spindle was cut from a single forging and slid on seven splines - the complete assembly being dynamically balanced. The gears were all hobbed from the solid, shaved, induction hardened and honed to produce the correct tooth form.
The 8.5" (216 mm) wide and 8" (203 mm) deep induction-hardened bed was supplied in one length, that admitted 40 inches between centres, and either with or without a gap. With the gap piece removed a piece of material 20.5" in diameter and 4.5" thick could be machined on the faceplate.
The screwcutting gearbox was, unlike those on all smaller Harrison lathes, completely enclosed and provided with oil-bath lubrication. It offered a choice of 36 threads and feeds from 4 to 60 tpi and it was possible to specify, at the time of ordering, a built-in metric-conversion cluster that enabled a range of 11 metric pitches to be generated by the movement of a single lever that emerged horizontally from the inside face of the changewheel cover. The power feeds ranged from 0.0017" to 0.025" ((0.043 mm to 0.63 mm) sliding and from 0.001" to 0.015" (0.025 mm to 0.38 mm) surfacing. The leadscrew was only used for screwcutting and engaged by a simple, hand-operated, sliding dog-clutch at the gearbox end of the shaft; the power shaft, below the leadscrew, was provided with a spring-loaded, safety over-ride mechanism to prevent damage in the case of a dig-in or other mechanical mayhem - unlike the L5 and L5A, it appears that a similar device to protect the leadscrew was not listed. 
Fitted with a proper taper gib strip - instead of the flat strip with push-screw adjustment often found on smaller industrial lathes machines of this age - both cross and top slide (the latter able to be turned through 360 degrees) featured zeroing micrometer dials. These, whilst not big enough, were nonetheless of adequate dimensions for younger eyes.  A "clog-heel" toolpost was fitted as standard but both 4-way toolpost, and later a quickset toolholder, were on the options' list and could be easily fitted to the T slotted top slide;  Unfortunately the cross slide was not, as on the later M Type lathes, of the full-length type; instead a short slide was used that, over time, tended to wear just the middle section of its ways on the saddle. To protect the cross-feed screw a thin sheet-metal insert (that is frequently damaged or missing on used machines) was set above it at the front with a robust, cast-aluminium cover over the rear.
Completely-enclosed and doubled-walled the apron was much deeper than on the smaller lathes and held an oil supply in its base from where it was distributed by splash; it employed the usual kind of push/pull button to select the power sliding and surfacing feeds, with the engagement lever positioned in the middle of the casting rather than hanging down beneath. A thread-dial indicator was fitted as part of the standard equipment.
Fitted with a No. 3 Morse taper the tailstock barrel was of the self-ejected type where the centre was pushed out by the feed screws as it was drawn fully back from its 4.5 inches of travel.
Fabricated from 3/16" thick steel plate the stand was equipped with a single locking storage cupboard (when there was ample room for two) and a deep chip tray; the makers recommended that the stand was not bolted down but simply made "stable" on the floor. The motor was mounted on a large rectangular dished plate hinged along its lower edge and pivoted on two bosses welded low down on the back of the stand behind the headstock. The plate was arranged to swing backwards and could be lowered to the floor behind the lathe so completely exposing the motor. Inside the plate were two pairs of motor rails, arranged at ninety degrees, that not only allowed an easy adjustment of the belt tension but also, because the motor could be shuffled around on the rails until it lined up exactly with the headstock pulley, for an easy change to be made to one of a different size or make.
During the early 1950s the Harrison Apprentice Training Department was charged with the reconditioning of a 13-inch model - the lathe subsequently being installed in the Royal Yacht
Britannia...

Early Harrison 13-inch. Note the distinctive twin levers pivoting from the front face of the headstock

Harrison 13-inch fitted with copying equipment

Bbored to pass a 1.625 inch diameter bar, the spindle ran on the usual Harrison arrangement of opposed Timken pre-loaded taper roller bearings at the front and a single-row ball race at the rear; it was fitted with an American type L0 nose - thankfully without the option of a threaded fitting. The main double gear that slid along the spindle was cut from a single forging and slid on seven splines - the complete assembly being dynamically balanced. The gears were all hobbed from the solid, shaved, induction hardened and honed to produce the correct tooth form.

Doubled-walled, the completely-enclosed apron was much deeper than on the smaller lathes and held an oil supply in its base (with a window to check the level) from where it was distributed by splash; it employed the usual kind of push/pull button to select the power sliding and surfacing feeds, with the engagement lever positioned in the middle of the casting rather than hanging down beneath; a thread-dial indicator was part of the standard equipment.




It was possible to specify, at the time of ordering, a built-in metric-conversion cluster which enabled a range of 11 metric pitches to be generated by the movement of a single lever that emerged horizontally from the inside face of the changewheel cover. In this picture the permanently mounted 127t metric translation wheel and the siding double gear to select it can be clearly seen.

Unlike those on all smaller Harrison lathes, the screwcutting gearbox was of a much sounder design being completely enclosed and provided with oil-bath lubrication. It offered a choice of 36 threads and feeds from 4 to 60 t.p.i and it was possible to specify, at the time of ordering, a built-in metric-conversion cluster that enabled a range of 11 metric pitches to be generated by the movement of a single lever that emerged horizontally from the inside face of the changewheel cover. The power feeds ranged from 0.0017" to 0.025" ((0.043 mm to 0.63 mm) sliding and from 0.001" to 0.015" (0.025 mm to 0.38 mm) surfacing.
On the right is the chrome-plated, spindle-clutch lever - and on the left (with the white knob) the lever to select metric screwcutting.




email: tony@lathes.co.uk
Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted
Machine Tool Manuals   Catalogues   Belts   Books  Accessories

Early HARRISON 13-Inch Lathe
A manual is available for this lathe
Flat-belt Drive L2   An Original L5
Harrison Home Page   L5 Early Model   Later L5 9" & L5A 11-inch"   140   
L5 Accessories   
10-inch   Late 10" & 12" L6   Early 12" L6     Late L6 Mk. 3   
13" & 15" Late Models    13"   14"   16"   17"    Hydraulic Copy Lathes
Harrison Union Lathes   Models 155 and 165   Model 190
14", 16" & 17" Accessories
Newer Models
:
AA-10 VS  VS330 & AA   M250   M300   M350 & 390   M400   M450   M500