E-Mail Tony@lathes.co.uk 
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South Bend 9-inch Clones
The Joinville Lathe
A suitable Handbook and Parts Manual is available for
the Joinville lathe


Other South Bend 9-inch Clones
Ace   Blomqvist - Boxford - Hercus - Joinville - Moody - Purcell
Sanches Blanes - Sheraton - Smart & Brown - Storebro - UFP   
Boffelli & Finazzi - Demco   NSTC - Select (Lin Huan) - Parkanson


South Bend 9-inch Home Page   South Bend Home   Accessories   
An Unused 9-inch    South Bend 9-inch Clones   In the Factory   
Original 1934 9-inch Model 5    World War 2 Export Papers


Usina Metalúgica Joinville was a Brazilian foundry and toolmaking business established in 1893 by Otto Bennack (an immigrant from Germany) and concentrated mainly on parts for the railroad industry and farming tools. The company remained in his hands until the Second World War when,  because of his German connections, he was forced to sell to the Government who feared for their neutrality. At some point during the 1940s a South Bend lathe was acquired as a master pattern and production stated of a straightforward copy - the donor machine (based on the appearance of the bed feet and other details) being of 1940 vintage.  The only significant modification made to the first production examples was a change from a V to a flat rear bedway - though soon afterwards a radial alteration was made when the headstock was modified to accept a larger bore spindle (0.826") running in parallel-bore, plain bronze spindle bearings held in conical housings by serrated screwed rings with adjustment by compression nuts. Later changes included a full-length cross slide carrying a single length-wise T-slot, extra-wide bed feet and an entirely different and simpler design of apron with a single vertical lever to select and engage power cross feed. Although driven by a key riding in a slotted leadscrew, as on the South Bend original, on the Joinville the apron mechanism was not used to provide a geared-down sliding feed along the bed - this being left to the screwcutting gearbox and leadscrew.
Development of the lathe continued during the 1950s and 1960s resulting, in the late 1960s, in the Model TM-127, a more angular machine, rather on the lines of a late-model Boxford and with the same type of taper-roller bearing headstock. This model continued to be available into the 1970s, being superseded by the types 217R and TM127, both of which were still able to accept many parts from earlier types.
Joinville also made a range of larger machines all of which, according to local reports by users, were of high quality and respected for their precision and accuracy.
One interesting aspect of the Company was its amateur football team - the Clube Atlético Operário - that won the local state championships (Santa Catarina) in 1956. Although gainfully employed in the factory, many players were chosen by the management for the football rather than engineering skills and were allowed to share their working time between workbench and practice field..
Joinville was eventually acquired by Romi (which still designs and manufactures metal-cutting machines) with manufacture of lathes passing to another company (Riosulense) who, by the late 1980s, were suffering (like all other makers of small lathes) from an influx of cheap Chinese machines and were forced to close.
If any reader has details of this or other Joinville machine tools, or access to any of the company's sales and technical literature, the writer would be pleased to hear from you.

Brazil was a country that used both inch and metric measurements in engineering and the screwcutting box on the Joinville was arranged for English-pitch threads. The screwcutting plate on the changewheel cover was engraved with metric conversion charts and lists of associated transposing  gears.

The larger-than-original spindle bore and the tumble-reverse gears

Comprehensive screwcutting chart on the changewheel cover. Like the South Bend original this could not be locked shut nor did it have an inner safety guard.

The top slide is held to the cross slide using the standard arrangement of pins pushing screwed in from each side but it was not T slotted for a toolholder - instead the present owner has fitted a solid post to carry a single toolholder split through one face and so easily adjustable by its clamp bolt. This arrangement, used on the Drummond and Myford M Type lathes, is known in Britain as a "Norman Patent" toolholder.
To the rear of the top-slide's location a single T slot is provided, running front to back along the centre line. The micrometer dials are larger than the South Bend originals and, with their knurled edges and ability to be zeroed, closely resemble those used on the Boxford clone.

The end of the leadscrew carries a useful handwheel - though this is an owner's modification.


One slight difference was the provision of angled oilers on the front face of the headstock. These, as on the South Bend, filled sumps beneath the bearings from which oil was lifted through wicks.

The earliest-known Joinville appears, apart from the flat rear bedway, to have been a straightforward copy of a 1940 South bend "Workshop" lathe

An early example of the Joinville with tapered bronze headstock bearings

The Joinville headstock spindle bearing

1972 Joinville Model 217R with taper-roller headstock bearings

Looking remarkably up-to-date a Joinville TM-127 from the early 1980s

The completely-different apron of the Joinville. Instead of power being taken to both longitudinal and cross travel this clone had it restricted to the cross feed only - with the clasp nuts providing both the screwcutting and sliding feeds. Although this was a perfectly satisfactory arrangement the original South Bend mechanism was superior in that it gave a geared-down and hence slower rate of sliding feed than could be obtained by use of changewheels and leadscrew.

View of the headstock showing the conventional backgears and the serrated nuts to retain the large adjustable bronze bearings with their tapered outsides. The bearing oilers are non-standard.


Other South Bend 9-inch Clones
Ace   Blomqvist - Boxford - Hercus - Joinville - Moody - Purcell
Sanches Blanes - Sheraton - Smart & Brown - Storebro - UFP   
Boffelli & Finazzi - Demco   NSTC - Select (Lin Huan) - Parkanson


South Bend 9-inch Home Page   South Bend Home   Accessories   
An Unused 9-inch    South Bend 9-inch Clones   In the Factory   
Original 1934 9-inch Model 5


A suitable Handbook and Parts Manual is available for
the Joinville lathe


South Bend 9-inch Clones
The Joinville Lathe
E-Mail Tony@lathes.co.uk 
Home    Machine Tool Archive    Machine Tools For Sale & Wanted
Manuals   Machine Tool Catalogues   Belts   Accessories   Books