email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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Schaublin 90, 102 & 102-VM Stands
& Drive Systems
A Operator's & Maintenance Manual is available for the 102-VM

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102N-VM Photographs   Schaublin SV9A Cam-forming Lathe




Massively heavy (274 kg/604 lb) the once popular cast-iron, one-piece stand and chip tray was available in a variety of configurations but, in its ordinary form (for the 102VM leadscrew lathe as Part No. 102-80), was generally supplied with the 2-speed 750/3000 r.p.m. 0.5/1.25 h.p. motor (No. 102-80.043) mounted on a hinged bracket that could be lifted by a foot pedal to ease speed changes; the standard V-belt driven countershaft unit (No. 102-80.100); a knee-operated start, stop and reversing switch (No. 102-80.300); either one or two centrally-positioned lockable storage drawers (No. 102-80.400) and a quick-action shifter (No. 102 VM-80.200) to move the flat belt driving the headstock spindle headstock. Operation of the shifter took a little practice to master, the technique being to operate it and the motor-lift pedal simultaneously. A special version of the stand (No. 102-82) was also manufactured for use in laboratories and the watchmaking industry and differed in having a flat Formica-inlaid top on a laminated wood base (so that small or delicate components could be handled safely between machining operations; using this stand precluded use of the coolant unit or its associated equipment. In addition to the standard countershaft unit several other drive systems and options were offered for the stands including:
Stepless Variable-speed Unit (No. 102-81.200): lathes fitted with this beautifully engineered unit can be instantly recognised by an enormous handwheel, with speed-indicator drum, mounted on the stand's front face. The drive, of traditional expanding-and-contracting pulley type, was powered by a 2-speed 750/3000 r.p.m 0.5 and 1.25 h.p. motor which gave, in direct drive, speeds from 270 to 3000 r.p.m with backgear giving a bottom speed of 55 r.p.m. Because the motor and headstock spindle were in fixed positions the drive unit itself was arranged to swing on a special frame; the result being that, as the pairs of pulleys opened and closed to vary the drive ratio, the tension of both belts was kept constant. Because the variable-speed belt ran over the headstock the flat-belt pulley on the spindle was replaced by a special wide (but non-opening, of course) V type. Choosing this drive system prevented the fitting of both mechanical-reversing and speed-reducing units.
Speed-reduction Unit (No. 102 VM-81.100): combined with backgear this 5 : 1 ratio step-down device gave an overall reduction of 1 : 25 and a range of extra-slow, high-torque speeds of: 8, 10, 14, 18, 24, 30, 34, 45, 55, 70 90 and 120 r.p.m. The slow-speed unit used a multi-plate clutch and, controlled by a long external lever sitting horizontally just below the belt-shifter knob, was able to change ratios with the motor running.
Combined Clutch and Brake Unit (No. 102-8): eventually to be offered as part of the standard equipment (from the late 1950s onwards), this drive employed two cones, mounted either side of a central plate and controlled by the action of a short-stroke foot pedal the position of which could be adjusted to suit operation from either a standing or sitting position. Releasing the pedal engaged the drive whilst a light press (2.5 to 3.0 kg) disconnected it.
Mechanical-reversing Unit (No. 102-81.300): although the standard 3-phase electric motor could reliably cope with up to 240 reversals per hour (and a special heavy-duty motor, with a maximum reverse cycle of 720 per hour was available) for production processes where reverses every few seconds were required the makers recommended the "Mechanical Reversing Unit" as a completely reliable solution.
Special footrest with pedal-operated reversing switch (No. 102-80.520): this was for use by a seated operator engaged in repetition work. The pedals were surrounded by a special rubber-covered footrest that could be adjusted to the angle and height that best suited the worker. In place of the pedal assembly a simple floor-mounted switch (No. 102-80.530) could be used instead.
Knee-operated reversing switch (No. 102-80-300). Designed for use with the operator standing up, this unit had an adjustable knee fork with buffers at each end of the stroke.
Special Footrest with Pedal-operated Reversing Switch (No. 102-80.520): intended for use with the operator sitting down the pedal was surrounded by a rubber-covered footrest and could be adjusted to any angle or height.
Footrest and Chair (No. 102-80.500) and No. 102-80.550 respectively). The height and angle-adjustable rubber-covered footrest was to help with operation of the clutch or brake whilst the special chair was also adjustable for height and back-rest angle
Coolant System (No. 102-80.400): this consisted of an aluminium 14-litre tank mounted in the right-hand cabinet leg, a submerged pump driven by a flange-mounted 3-phase, 3000 r.p.m. 1-h.p. motor with a thermal-overload switch and an articulated distribution arm. Ever keen to extract the maximum profit from its customers Schaublin even had the cheek to charge extra for the perforated drain plate (No. 102-80.700) that fitted into the left-hand end of the chip tray.
Sheet-metal Splashback (No. 102-81.400): another item that should have been included with the coolant equipment, the splashback was supplied with two simple clamps that tightened onto the back edge of the chip tray.
Light Unit (No. 102-80.800): although the light had to be powered separately (there was no socket on the machine) the light, with its switch, could be fixed anywhere on the back edge of the chip tray.
Grinding-between-Centres Drive Unit (No. 102-95.100-2-300): in addition to the main drive systems other useful stand-mounted accessories were available: an overhead-drive assembly that bolted to a machined surface on the back face of the cabinet with a switched 0.33 h.p. 3-phase motor, a 4-step pulley to take a round drive belt, an adjustable, swivelling belt-tensioning attachment and 4 "loose" pulleys that self-aligned to transmit the drive; a complete coolant unit with its 1 h.p. 3000 r.p.m. motor, submerged pump and 14-litre aluminium tank mounted inside the right-hand plinth; a light unit on a flexible arm attached to the rear edge of the chip tray and a sheet-metal splash back..


Above and below: the Stepless Variable-speed Unit (No. 102-81.200). from a 102 showing the enormously heavy build and careful attention to design details



Clearly visible in this picture is the heavy cross tube that carried the drive across to line it up with the headstock pulley


A simpler drive system as fitted to a 1948 Type TP-32 Schaublin 102 Toolmakers' lathe with a foot pedal and knee-controlled shifter to aid rapid spindle speed changes

1948 Type TP-32 Schaublin 102 Toolmakers' lathe--internal detail of drive countershaft system



A Operator's & Maintenance Manual is available for the 102-VM

Schaublin Home  Model 65 & 70 Lathes   Model 90 & 102 Plain Lathes 
102N-VM   102-VM     102 Accessories   102 Stands and Drives 
102-VM Accessories   102-VM Collets  120-VM   Schaublin 125 Lathe 
102VM Photographs   120-VM    SV-130 & SV-150  135 Lathe  Schaublin Millers 
102N-VM Photographs   Schaublin SV9A Cam-forming Lathe

Schaublin 90, 102 & 102-VM Stands
& Drive Systems

email: tony@lathes.co.uk
Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted
Machine Tool Manuals   Catalogues   Belts   Books  Accessories