email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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Drummond Hand-operated Shaper

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Drummond Lathes


First built when Drummond Brothers were still operating from the home address of Arthur Drummond in Pinks Hill, Wood Street, Guildford, the Drummond 7" stroke hand-operated shaping machine was a splendid examples of late Victorian engineering. Protected by patents (GB) 24772 and 24773 dated November 5th 1908 together with 25262 and 25263 of November 9th 1908, it was a very well-made, rugged little machine with an automatic feed in both directions and made in early and late forms. Both types were very similar but with the former (a very rare model) having a table 6.5" x 4.5" with 7 inches of horizontal travel, 4.5 inches vertically and - an instant identification point - no T-slots in the table top with holes tapped 3/8" Whitworth being provided instead. Other differences noted include: the bracket that carried the table feed lever was not cast in to the main body of the machine but bolted on; the tool slide was locked by a nut on the end of a long stud that passed down the length of the ram and the bracket that carried the table's feed lever was not cast in to the main body of the machine but bolted on; the clapper box had a slot that straddled a male tennon and the moving jaw on the maker's vice was longer
Much more common version, the later version had a distinctly different clapper box with two square-headed bolts to retain the cutting tool and a simple bolt through the rotating part to lock it in place. The table had a top surface of  8" by 9" with two longitudinal T-slots and a circular T-slot that allowed the standard-fit, degree-graduated base vice to be rotated. However, these cost-saving improvements came at the price of a reduction in table travel to 6" horizontally and 3" vertically. One notable and very useful feature was the inclusion of a circular hole through the body of the shaper - below and in line with the ram - that allowed long work to be passed through from the back and very long keyways cut, or machining work carried out part way along the length. The tool post could be swivelled, was marked with degree divisions - and had a travel of 1.5".
Costing 7 : 10s : 0d (delivered) when new in 1902 a vice, three cutting tools, a spanner and tommy-bar were included with the machine.
Serial Numbers extracted from the Work's records
1902 to 1918 no records survive
1919 to 1920 Serials 469 to 533
1920              Serials 534 to 599
1920 to 1921 Serials 600 to 665 (the majority sent to India)
1921 to 1925 Serials 666 to 730 (No. 757 dated at 19-9-1922)
1925 to 1928 Serials 731 to 794
1928 to 1934 Serials 795 to 860 (No. 799 dated at 21-1-1929)
1934 to 1939 Serials 861 to 875
The last example was sent to Owen Wallis & Co. on 13-2-1939

Very rare Mk. 1 Drummond shaper with tapped holes in the table top

Early model: the clapper box had a slot that straddled a male tennon and the moving jaw on the maker's vice was longer

Early model:  the tool slide was locked by a nut on the end of a long stud that passed down the length of the ram

Early model: the bracket that carried the table feed lever was not cast in to the main body of the machine but bolted on


Drummond Mk. 2 Shaper. Note the traditional shaper cutting tool, designed to allow its cutting edge to be exactly in line with the base of the "clapper box". If the tool edge was positioned in front of its support surface there would tendency for it to "dig in" and increase the depth of cut whilst, if allowed to sit behind the edge, exactly the opposite would happen.


Continued on Page 2 (of 2) 

Drummond Lathes

Drummond Hand-operated Shaper
email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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