email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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Now out of production and not, so far as the writer is aware, of a design available today from any other manufacturer, the Taylor 2, 3 and 4-jaw self-centring chucks were, at one time, considered the "Rolls-Royce" of the type and featured a conical "taper-scroll". Designed by a member of the family firm, George Taylor, they were originally manufactured (along with machine vices) at a separate facility in the Birmingham Bull Ring before being transferred, in the early 1960s, to the Bartholomew Street site. All the moving parts - scrolls and jaws - were hardened and ground with their thread a deep V shape, not the square-section used in conventional chucks. The makers certainly had confidence in their quality and offered a 2-year warranty against breakage of any kind - indeed, whilst the writer has seen hundreds of conventional chuck jaws with one or more of their first teeth missing he has never seen a Taylor jaw damaged in any way whatsoever. However, not all was sweetness and light - for their size the chucks were heavy and that part of the "bar" jaws which contacted the work always had a rather wide surface, hence they were not suitable for lightly-built lathes, nor for holding very small diameters. The makers offered both soft jaws, for turning out to grip difficult jobs in the usual way, and also a wide range of special and made-to-order (hardened) jaws and "false jaws" to suit a customer's particular production process.
The range started with a 4.5-inch diameter 3-jaw, with a minimum capacity of 3/32" and a maximum of 3
5/8", and ended with a hefty 20-inch model that could hold a minimum of 1" in diameter and a maximum of 175/8". To spread their appeal, the company offered the 6.5", 8.5", 10" and 12" diameter models with an alternative smaller minimum holding capacity and all sizes could be had with an increased through bore - though, the maker warned, at the expense of reduced strength.
The ordinary jaws for gripping bars stock were smooth on their outer face and so, to complete the set, two more types were needed - one to grip inside diameters and the other outside diameters. Because the chucks were only supplied with one set of jaws (and the chucks were priced as a premium product), the total cost was always significantly more than equivalent models from rival English makers Burnerd and Pratt.

Compound slide rests: Above, the Type 100 with a simple and economical design of top post and toolpost.
Below, the Type 102, with a typically early English-type two-bar clamp toolpost; this could be changed for a 4-way type at extra cost.
The compound slide rests offered by Taylor were rugged assemblies and 
obviously designed to withstand the ham-fisted efforts of unskilled or semi-skilled operators. There was no need for micrometer dials in brass-finishing or simple plain turning work (skilled workmen used calipers to size jobs as they progressed) and the slides, although described as "improved", could well have been (as they almost certainly were) designed in the 1890s.

An unusual "No-Body" demonstration showing how the tapered scroll could hold a 56 lb weight.  The aim was to demonstrate that the chuck's body (unlike that of a conventional model) was in no way stressed when a component was being gripped--all the forces being contained within the scroll and jaws.

24-inch eccentric chuck

121/2" Eccentric chuck.
Normally used for ornamental turning these two heavier-duty models were intended for production purposes where they might have been employed in the making of heavy steel and iron dies, the manufacture of oval good such as knobs and brush backs or even for trimming and beading work on sheet steel trays as large as 30" x 20" or "oval sleeve links" as tiny as 3/4" x 5/16".
The chucks were available in 6 sizes, from a baby 6-inch to a massive 30-inches in diameter, and were capable of being adjusted to produce from a circle to an oval with a difference between the large and small diameters of 1.5" in the case of the 6-inch chuck and 10 inches for the 30-inch model.
Whilst the chuck's backing plate was an ordinary iron casting screwed to fit the spindle nose (these could be specially ordered) the slides were in gun metal. On the 16, 24 and 30-inch models the position of the spindle nose could be adjusted independently.

From an early catalogue the Taylor "Lathe Milling Attachment". This combined lever and screw-operated device incorporated a simple 48-tooth dividing attachment - taken from the well-known range that Taylor had offered from their earliest years. The to-and-fro motion was operated by the long lever, adjustments of cut depth towards the headstock by a  captive thumb wheel and height adjustment by means unspecified - but probably by screwing the unit up and down.

email: tony@lathes.co.uk
Home   Machine Tool Archive   
Machine-tools Sale & Wanted
Machine Tool Manuals   Catalogues   Belts   
Books   Accessories

Taylor Chucks &
Lathe Accessories
Taylor Home Page 
Kennedy Bending & Taylor Cutting-off Machines
Taylor Capstan Lathes 
Taylor Chucks & Lathe Accessories   
Kennedy Hexacut Saws
Taylor Brass Lathes   Conventional Taylor Lathes 
Taylor Trimming and Beading Lathes

Technical and sales literature is available
for Taylor machines