email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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T. Taylor Planer

T.T.Taylor Home Page

A remarkably versatile yet essentially simple and cheaply constructed machine tool, the planer is able, in a limited space, to handle large components that would otherwise require the services of a huge, expensive and heavy milling machine. Indeed, so adaptable is it, that even very old ones, fitted with powered milling heads on the bridge and uprights (when they are known as a plano-miller), can still be found working in shipyards and other places dealing with large and awkwardly-shaped components. For the amateur the benefits of the shaper were also recognised and from around 1870 to 1920 a number of miniature versions were manufactured; even today these are still sought-after machines, very handy as a working tool and, of course, as an interesting and mechanically delightful artefact. Four of these little bench-mounted T.Taylor planers - one powered the others hand-operated -  have surface in recent years; two reside in the United States and two in England (if you have a T.Taylor machine tool of any description the writer would be interested to hear from you). It appears that the planer was fitted with an automatic indexing feed to drive the cutter head across the table, a ratchet-and-pawl mechanism being used to shift the head slightly after each stroke of the table.
Although numbers of these machines are by known makers including (in the UK)  Milnes, Senior (and Firth), Selig, Hesketh Walker, Brittain, and Britannia many others remain unrecognised. If you have a similar machine, please do get in touch


A hand-powered T.Taylor planer from the late Victorian era

This version of the T.Taylor planer has survived with its automatic indexing traverse feed to the cutter head


A T.Taylor planer as sold for powered countershaft drive. Note the mechanism for the cross-head feed - this was a flick-over ratchet assembly that gave an indexed feed in both directions.

The position of the crank-arm end in the T-slotted disc varied the stroke

Part of the original drive system

A fast-and-loose pulley system provided  the initial drive

End view of the fast-and-loose pulley assembly


T.Taylor Home Page

T. Taylor Planer
email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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