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Emwee PR-8 Turret Lathe

Manufactured by L.P.Grothauzen in Venlo, Holland during the late 1940s and early 1950s, the interesting 7-inch centre height by 15 inches between centres EMWEE turret lathe was handled in the United Kingdom by Industrial Machine & Equipment Co. Ltd. of 41 Murray Road, London S.W.19.
Heavily built (it weighed just over half a ton) the bed and headstock cast were cast as-one in Mehanite iron and carried on a stand made from welded steel plate. A tool storage cabinet was built into the stand's right-hand face, a lift-off door for access to the drive system provided on the left-hand face and another hinged door at the rear on which was carried the optional coolant equipment.
Of unusual design for a small production machine, the indexing cutting and threading tools were carried not by the usual type of bed-mounted rotating turret, but in a massive, patented tailstock that could be specified with either four or six No. 2 Morse taper holders formed in the end of its large diameter, rotating spindle. The stroke, driven by a long handle, was 4.375", with each holder having its own screwed stop and indexed round in the usual way to line up with the headstock spindle. If required, for conventional between-centres work the spindle could be locked and, if the lathe was intended for just for simple boring or drilling jobs (though at a very expensive 575 in 1952 this would have been a hopelessly uneconomic proposal), a much lighter, ordinary No. 2 Morse taper single-spindle lever-action tailstock was offered in lieu of the capstan version.
One special extra offered by the makers to fit the turret was a set of threading taps and dies; the length of thread to be cut could be pre-set on the diehead with the system claiming to be unusually fast.
Made from high-tensile steel, the 1.375" bore headstock spindle ran in adjustable, high-precision twin-type SKF roller bearings with SKF ball races for thrust. The nose, in standard form, was fitted for collets only, though at extra cost it could be modified to accept a 3-jaw chuck. Hardened, ground and tempered in the usual way and manufactured to an accuracy of better than 0.0004", the collets were available in sets to hold round, square or hexagon stock and had a maximum through bore of 1.1875". Collet opening and closing was by a lever working through two toggles (all the revolving and sliding parts being hardened and ground) with a separate lever-operated spindle lock provided to allow easy changing of collets or fittings on the spindle nose.
Drive came from a 3-phase, 2-speed 1/1.5 h.p. 700/1400 r.p.m. reversing motor fastened to an adjustable plate inside the stand with a V-belt used to transmit the drive to an intermediate countershaft, this being fitted with a 3-step pulley on early models and a 4-step on later types. From the countershaft the drive rose to the 3 or 4-step headstock pulley, overhung on the end of the spindle. To slacken the belt to allow for changes of speed, both the motor platform and intermediate countershaft were connected together by a vertical rod split into upper and lower sections with each threaded so that the belts could be individually tensioned - the operating lever being connected to a pivot point between the two parts.
On early 3-step models it is likely that six speeds would have been available (using a single-speed motor with a 2-step pulley on its shaft) while later 4-pulley models were available with the option of a 2-speed 700/1400 r.p.m. motor that gave 16 speeds spanning 150 to 2100 r.p.m. The last versions made probably discarded the intermediate countershaft with the drive coming direct from a 2 h.p. 4-speed pole-changing motor (with speeds of 375, 750, 1500 and 3000 r.p.m.) that allowed an instant change. by electrical switch. from highest to lowest - ideal if the job required the turning of a small diameter followed by a slow-speed threading operation; the spindle speeds themselves numbered sixteen (four on the pulleys and four on the motor) that varied from 120 to 3360 r.p.m.
Instead of the expected simple cut-off (forming) slide, the
Emwee was equipped with a conventional form of compound slide rest - though the details of its arrangement construction were far from ordinary. Costing an extra 40 (only a little less than a complete backgeared and screwcutting contemporary Myford ML7 lathe) it was mounted on and able to rotate about a separate circular boss fitted in front of the bed - the whole assembly able to be slide along for a short distance and locked down by a through-bolt with the clamping levers emerging from the underside of a recess in the centre of the stand. The slide rest had 7 inches of longitudinal travel, 5 inches across and could be had in various specifications with either all-screw or all lever feed or fitted with a capstan-handle-operated longitudinal feed with a combination screw and lever-feed cross motion. When fitted with screw feeds the micrometer dials had vernier scales that allowed settings down to as fine as 0.002". Both cross and top slides had beautifully made and adjustable 4-position drum-type stops, each being rotated into position as required. A 4-way toolpost was fitted as standard, its mechanism being cleverly designed so that one-handed operation was possible - a one-quarter turn of the handle rotating the next tool into position and locking the unit down. As an additional refinement, as the toolpost turned it was not lifted, so avoiding the ingress of swarf and dirt..

Emwee PR8 Turret lathe with a weight-powered bar-feed attachment

Made from high-tensile steel, the 1.375" bore headstock spindle ran in adjustable, high-precision twin-type SKF roller bearings with SKF ball races for thrust. The nose, in standard form, was fitted for collets only, though at extra cost it could be modified to accept a 3-jaw chuck.

Drive came from a 3-phase, 2-speed 1/1.5 h.p. 700/1400 r.p.m. reversing motor fastened to an adjustable plate inside the stand with a V-belt used to transmit the drive to an intermediate countershaft, this being fitted with a 3-step pulley on early models and a 4-step on later types. From the countershaft the drive rose to the 3 or 4-step headstock pulley, overhung on the end of the spindle. To slacken the belt to allow for changes of speed, both the motor platform and intermediate countershaft were connected together by a vertical rod split into upper and lower sections with each threaded so that the belts could be individually tensioned - the operating lever being connected to a pivot point between the two parts.

Copying Attachment
Of simple design this unit consisted of a pilot rod, tracer and a suitable template. The pilot rod could be adjusted axially and, when not in use, easily removed. The template was fixed to the pilot rod with three screws.

Made from high-tensile steel, the 1.375" bore headstock spindle ran in adjustable, high-precision twin-type SKF roller bearings with SKF ball races for thrust. The nose, in standard form, was fitted for collets only, though at extra cost it could be modified to accept a 3-jaw chuck.

Of unusual design for a small production machine, the indexing cutting and threading tools were carried not by the usual type of bed-mounted rotating turret, but in a massive, patented tailstock that could be specified with either four or six No. 2 Morse taper holders formed in the end of its large diameter, rotating spindle. The stroke, driven by a long handle, was 4.375", with each holder having its own screwed stop and indexed round in the usual way to line up with the headstock spindle. If required for conventional between-centres work, the spindle could be locked.

If the lathe was intended for just for simple boring or drilling jobs (though at a very expensive 575 in 1952 this would have been a hopelessly uneconomic proposal), a much lighter, ordinary No. 2 Morse taper single-spindle lever-action tailstock was offered in lieu of the capstan version.

A 4-way toolpost was fitted as standard, its mechanism being cleverly designed so that one-handed operation was possible - a one-quarter turn of the handle rotating the next tool into position and locking the unit down. As an additional refinement, as the toolpost turned it was not lifted, so avoiding the ingress of swarf and dirt..

Instead of the expected simple cut-off (forming) slide, the Emwee was equipped with a conventional form of compound slide rest - though the details of its arrangement construction were far from ordinary. Costing an extra 40 (only a little less than a complete backgeared and screwcutting contemporary Myford ML7 lathe) it was mounted on and able to rotate about a separate circular boss fitted in front of the bed - the whole assembly able to be slide along for a short distance and locked down by a through-bolt with the clamping levers emerging from the underside of a recess in the centre of the stand. The slide rest had 7 inches of longitudinal travel, 5 inches across and could be had in various specifications with either all-screw or all lever feed or fitted with a capstan-handle-operated longitudinal feed with a combination screw and lever-feed cross motion.

Compound slide assembly with lever-action feeds. The cross-feed could be operated by lever or screw - a small toggle handle being provided on the right-hand side of the slide to lock the lever when the screw was in use.
Note the 4-position, drum-type rotating travel stops