email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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Eriksen "Palermo" and "Kreta" Lathes - Germany


Eriksen Emato 180-DN & 200-DN (Eriksen Home Page)

Eriksen Emato 80-NE, 200-NE & 50/200Rv Lathes

Eriksen Emato EF & EFE Series Lathes

Eriksen Shapers

A set of catalogues is available for Eriksen lathes


If you have an Eriksen lathe, especially pre-1950, the writer would be interested to know


Of an earlier design to other Eriksen lathes of the 1950s, the 7-inch centre height "Palermo" and 8-inch centre height "Kreta 200N" were, apart from their swing, of identical design. Each was offered in a choice of four between-centre capacities: 30", 40", 49", 60" and 78". The Vee-and-flat bed was supplied as standard with a decently wide, detachable bridge section that could take faceplate-mounted work up to 21 inches in diameter on the Palermo and 23-inches on the Kreta - the maximum thickness that could be mounted on the 13.75-inch diameter faceplate being, in each case, 8.25". Curiously the makers quoted a swing some 1/4-inch less than twice the centre height, presumably on the basis of the latter being measured from a point immediately below the spindle and in line with the bed flats.
Cast as a box section, the 10.25-inch wide bed had its inside (thrust face) of the saddle Vee being made especially wide to better absorb the cutting forces. Although the saddle wings were noticeably long (with tapped holes in the left-hand pair to mount a travelling steady) they were not, as on other Eriksen models, T-slotted to act as a boring table. To get the cutting tool up the faceplate without the saddle passing over thin air with the gap piece removed, the cross-slide was set to the left of the saddle centre line.
Fitted with tapered gib strips, the compound slide rest assembly had a top-slide could be rotated through 360; unfortunately, the standard toolpost was the type to be expected on a much lighter machine: a simple triangular plate, supported on a light spring and with a knurled-edge, levelling screw.
Double walled, the apron had its gear shafts supported at both ends and what the makers described as a
centralised lubrication system - a simple, one-point, manually-attended oiling system that fed lubricant to each section of the interior. Sliding and surfacing feeds were fitted driven from a separate shaft set beneath the leadscrew. Engagement of each feed was by individual screw-in-and-out knobs on the apron's front face, these operating simple friction clutches with feed rates were set at 0.005" to 0.08" sliding and 0.003" to 0.004" surfacing. However, the slowness of the screw knobs to disengage the feeds would have put the lathes at a disadvantage compared to many of their competitors (as well as other Eriksen lathes) which had much safer and easier-to-use, instant-release drop-worm systems.
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For a lathe of this size made into the late 1950s, the headstock was of distinctly old-fashioned design with the 113/16"-bore, high-tensile steel spindle fitted with a threaded nose and running in phosphor bronze bearings secured in place by bolt-down caps - end thrust being taken by a ball bearing race. Backgear was mounted on an eccentric shaft behind the spindle with an engagement lever at its left-hand end. The spindle drive must have eaten into the maker's profits for, instead of a simple self-contained belt-drive unit mounted inside or behind the stand, four different and incompatible systems were offered, none of which can have shared parts and including one that required a different headstock casting. All methods have a total of six speeds, the three being:
"
Pre-selector" - a system that allowed the operator to set, by means of a headstock face mounted dial, any of 9 set speeds (18 with backgear) from 14 to 560 rpm; the final drive to the spindle being by twin V-belts.
"
Infinitely Variable Speed Friction Drive" - this giving stepless speeds between 22 and 550 rpm with final drive to the headstock spindle by a three side-by-side V-belts.
"
Flat-belt Brive Countershaft" -  from a 3-speed, rear-mounted countershaft driven from the motor by "silent chain" - this arrangement giving speeds from a low of 27.5 in back gear to a rather slow maximum of just 405 r.p.m.
"Remote Bountershaft" - where drive by lineshafting in the factory roof was still used (and numbers were, even in the 1950s), the makers offered a vintage-style remote countershaft with fast and loose pulleys and belt strikers. The unit was intended to be run at 250 r.p.m driven by a 1.75-inch wide flat belt to give spindle speeds from 27.5 to 409 r.p.m. However, by 1955 this option had been dropped and sales and technical literate suitably amended.
Drive from spindle to screwcutting gearbox was through changewheels and a tumble-reverse mechanism mounted inboard of the changewheels. The gearbox, with an unusual externally-mounted indexing rotary selector, was able (in conjunction with a 4 t.p.i. leadscrew - to generate 45 different inch pitches from 2 to 56 t.p.i. and, by mounting the transposing ears supplied with every machine, a metric threads from 0.25 to 15 mm pitch.
Heavily built, the tailstock was a robust "solid" casting locked to the bed by a lever-operated cam-type cross shaft and with a top that could be offset on the sole plate to turn slight tapers. Unfortunately, for the size of the lathe, the No. 2 Morse taper socket in the spindle would have proved in inadequate on anything other than light drilling jobs and, unlike other Eriksen lathes of that era, did not have the opening in the casting to view the engraved ruler lines.
Equipment supplied with each new lathe consisted of a faceplate-cum-4-jaw chuck, fixed steady (both to be dropped in 1955), travelling steady, catchplate, a spare chuck backplate, screwcutting changewheels, two Morse centres, a screwcutting chart and a set of spanners.
Available at extra cost was a thread-dial indicator, 4-way toolpost, a rear toolpost for parting off, handwheel-operated draw-in collet attachment, taper-turning attachment, coolant equipment driven by either a belt or electric motor, a factory-fitted 3-jaw chuck and rotating centres, sets of turning tools, a 7.5-inch diameter 3-jaw chuck on a backplate mount and drill chucks and rotating centres for the tailstock..




Eriksen Emato 180-DN & 200-DN (Eriksen Home Page)

Eriksen Emato 80-NE, 200-NE & 50/200Rv Lathes

Eriksen Emato EF & EFE Series Lathes


Eriksen Shapers

A set of catalogues is available for Eriksen lathes

If you have an Eriksen lathe, especially pre-1950, the writer would like to know

lathes.co.uk
Eriksen "Palermo" and "Kreta" Lathes - Germany
email: tony@lathes.co.uk
Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted  Machine Tool Manuals   
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