email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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lathes.co.uk
Eriksen "Emato" 180-NE, 200-NE & 50/200Rv Lathes


Eriksen Emato 180-DN & 200-DN (Eriksen Home Page)

Eriksen Emato EF & EFE Series Lathes

Eriksen Palermo and Kreta Lathes   

Eriksen Shapers

A set of catalogues is available for Eriksen lathes


If you have an Eriksen lathe, especially pre-1950, the writer would be interested to know


Of an entirely different design and intended for heavier duty use than the 180-DN and 200-DN models, the Eriksen 180-NE and 200-NE lathes were both of identical mechanical specification save for their centre heights, that for the former being 7 inches and the latter 8 inches. Each model was available with a choice of three bed lengths - that gave 40, 60 and 78 inches between centres - all being fitted with a detachable gap piece that, when removed, allowed a workpiece 223/4" in diameter on the 180-NE and 243/8" on the 200-DN to be turned on the faceplate - the depth of the job limited, in each case, to 63/4 ".
Made from an alloyed cast iron, the 11
3/4" wide, box-section bed had its front and back walls braced by diagonal ribs and used V and flat ways - though these were not hardened, nor was this process offered as an extra. To better absorb wear, the front V had its outer surface made wider and set at a shallow angle to better absorb wear while the inner section was shorter and steeper to take tool thrust. Although as standard the lathe was supported on two separate cast-iron, box-type plinths joined by a sheet-metal chip and coolant tray, as an extra-cost option, a heavy, full-depth cast-iron cabinet could be supplied, this having a small compartment at each end, the one under the headstock containing the electrical control gear with its door secured against opening unless the main switch was in the off position.
Fitted with hardened and ground gears, the headstock had 18 speeds arranged in geometrical progression at a ratio of 1.25. Two ranges were available, the standard 22 to 1120 r.p.m. or a special version (that incorporated some other modifications) of 45 to 2300 r.p.m. Both were driven by the same 5 h.p., 1400 r.p.m. 50 Hz motor that could be either flange mounted against the headstock's left-hand face, or at the back with drive to the input pulley by three V-belts. Electrical stop, start and reverse were controlled by a "third-rod" system, the operating lever pivoting from the apron's right-hand face (and so moving with the carriage) - the system incorporating an adjustable, multi-plate clutch and combined brake unit with a built-in shock absorber. When operated, this mechanism braked the spindle to a stop but left the motor running but the spindle stopped.
Bored through to clear 2 inches, the hardened and ground headstock spindle carried a sleeve-down-adapter to take a No. 3 Morse taper centre and (unusually for a lathe made at this time) a threaded nose instead of American long-taper safety fitting. The specification of the thread is not known - and may have been to a customer's particular requirement. The spindle was supported at the front in a special, high-precision bearing with four rows of caged balls while the headstock with the high-speed option - 45 to 2300 r.p.m. - had the bearing fed with a pressurised oil supply taken from a circular manifold in the roof of the headstock that also directed oil, through a series of pipes, to various points within the housing. At the rear, the spindle ran in another high-precision bearing, a twin-groove type. Final drive to the spindle inside the headstock was by a single gear of helical, form, all the sliding gears - and the clutch/brake - being arranged on layshafts to the rear.
Coolant equipment was optional and, when fitted could only be switched on when the main motor was running, two red lights indicating that power was going to both main motor and coolant circuits. A single push button was provided as an emergency stop to cut the power to both.
Screwcutting was by a Norton-type quick-change gearbox with a combination of tumbler and lever control on the face of the box and headstock - with one lever available to select coarse pitches. Interestingly, on lathes with the standard speed range, the leadscrew had a pitch of 1/4" while on those with the high-speed option it was 1/2". The box, driven in the usual way by changewheels, was arranged such that, when the leadscrew was in use for threading, the sliding and surfacing feeds drive shaft did not turn - and vice versa. The box was able to generate 80 English (Whitworth) pitches from 1/4" to 56 t.p.i., 68 metric from 0.5 to 11.2 mm and 52 module from 0.25 to 28 MOD - with all common pitches of all types available without recourse to altering the changewheel drive. Eighty rates of power sliding and surfacing feeds were provided, the former from 0.0006" to 0.1356" per revolution of the spindle and the latter from 0.0004" to 0.0959".
Rather unusually, a single apron-mounted lever - rotating around a cylindrical boss cut with a slotted gate - was used to select and engage not only the power feeds but also the opening and closing of the leadscrew clasp nuts; the actions were, of course, interlocked to prevent the use of more than one motion at a time. In addition, the apron was protected by the use of a drop-worm mechanism, this being adjustable for the load at which it automatically disengaged and allowing - no matter how high the cutting load - for both the instantaneous manual release of a feed and the use of an automatic, adjustable trip for the sliding feed when moving towards the headstock. An interesting feature of the apron was its lubrication system which, as the casting was open at the bottom to accommodate the drop-worm mechanism could not use an oil bath; instead oil was directed by wicks that their supply troughs in which they lay. Control of the carriage left and right movements (and left and right-hand threading) was by a reversing mechanism, that used spur gears,  built into the headstock.
Continued below:

High-resolution pictures - may be slow to open


Eriksen 180-NE and 200-NE lathes were both of identical mechanical specification
save for their centre heights, that for the former being 7 inches and the latter 8 inches.

Continued:
Equipped with exceptionally long wings that extended to the right from the main casting, the saddle had the usual felt wipers but also tapered gip strips to adjust the fit. Also fitted with tapered gib strips, the cross and tip slides were of quite ordinary, V-edged pattern - though the cross slide may have been fitted, as standard, with two long traverse T-slots to mount a rear toolpost. The top slide could be rotated through 90 each side of central and was fitted with a simple, triangular tool clamp - two types of 4-way toolpost being optional extras. Both feed-screws on the compound slide rest assembly had zeroing micrometer dials which, while not huge, were of a decent size and given a non-glare, satin-chrome finish The bronze cross-slide nut was adjustable to eliminate backlash. Oddly for a European lathe, the carriage handwheel was set to the left-hand end of the apron in the preferred American style - though the lathe may also have been made with a mirror-image design to reverse this arrangement.
Locked to the bed by a lever-operated, eccentric cross shaft, the set-over tailstock had a No.3 Morse taper, the centre being automatically ejected as the spindle reached its fully retracted position. Unusually for a large lathe, the casting was cut away to form a window through which the spindle's ruler engravings could be read - though there was no accompanying micrometer dial on the handwheel.
An additional model, the 50/200Rv, intended for production use was also available, this being otherwise as the ordinary models but with the tailstock replaced by a secondary slide fitted with a 6-station capstan head - the whole assembly able to be propelled along the bed using either hand or the power feed shaft. The power-sliding mechanism was identical to that used in the apron of the conventional model and incorporated both the automatic over-load release and the adjustable, pre-set disengage to the drive - this being engineered using radially arranged stop screws that met a fixed stop, so making it possible for each of the six stations to be set with its own length of feed. Turret unlocking and locking was automatic - the first movement of the 4-spoke handwheel released the clamping ring, the next rotated it followed by the ring automatically securing the new setting. As the turret could also be used as a tailstock, the lathe could be quickly adapted back to conventional turning - or the ordinary slide rest used simultaneously with the capstan unit in the setting up of a particular job.
Supplied as part of the standard equipment with each new lathe was a full complement of electrical equipment, a 4-jaw-chuck-cum-faceplate with hardened, reversible jaws, catchplate, a spare threaded chuck backplate, fixed steady, travelling steady, a number of extra changewheels to extend the threading range of the screwcutting gearbox, a chip tray for the ordinary model on the two-plinth stand,, two Morse centres, screwcutting chart, an instruction manual that included a foundation chart, recommended cutting speeds and lubrication arrangements - and a set of spanners.
Available at extra cost were a number of extras including a hydraulic copying attachment, thread-dial indicator, 4-way toolpost, handwheel-operated draw-in collet attachment, taper-turning attachment for lengths up to 16 inches, a rear toolpost for parting off, coolant equipment, a factory-fitted 7.5-inch diameter 3-jaw chuck and rotating centres and drill chucks for the tailstock.
If you have an Eriksen lathe of this type, the writer would be interested to hear from you.

Fitted with hardened and ground gears, the headstock had 18 speeds arranged in geometrical progression at a ratio of 1.25. Two ranges were available, the standard 22 to 1120 r.p.m. or a special version (that incorporated some other modifications) of 45 to 2300 r.p.m.


An interesting feature of the apron's was its lubrication system which, as the casting was open at the bottom to accommodate the drop-worm mechanism could not use an oil bath; instead oil was directed by wicks that their supply troughs in which they lay

An additional model, the 50/200Rv, intended for production use was also available, this being otherwise as the ordinary models but with the tailstock replaced by a secondary slide fitted with a 6-station capstan head - the whole assembly able to be propelled along the bed using either hand or the power feed shaft. The power-sliding mechanism was identical to that used in the apron of the conventional model and incorporated both the automatic over-load release and the adjustable, pre-set disengage to the drive - this being engineered using radially arranged stop screws that met a fixed stop, so making it possible for each of the six stations to be set with its own length of feed. Turret unlocking and locking was automatic - the first movement of the 4-spoke handwheel released the clamping ring, the next rotated it followed by the ring automatically securing the new setting. As the turret could also be used as a tailstock, the lathe could be quickly adapted back to conventional turning - or the ordinary slide rest used simultaneously with the capstan unit in the setting up of a particular job.


Hydraulically-operated copying attachment


Eriksen Emato 180-DN & 200-DN (Eriksen Home Page)

Eriksen Emato EF & EFE Series Lathes

Eriksen Palermo and Kreta Lathes   


Eriksen Shapers

A set of catalogues is available for Eriksen lathes

If you have an Eriksen lathe, especially pre-1950, the writer would be interested to know

lathes.co.uk
Eriksen "Emato" 180-NE, 200-NE & 50/200Rv Lathes
email: tony@lathes.co.uk
Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted  Machine Tool Manuals   
Catalogues   Belts   Books  Accessories