email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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lathes.co.uk
Eriksen EF and EFE Series Lathes
"Emato" 220-EF, 250-EF, 300-EF, 350-EF,
220-EFE, 250-EFE, 300-EFE & 350-EFE


Eriksen Emato 180-DN & 200-DN (Eriksen Home Page)

Eriksen Emato 180-NE, 200-NE & 50/200Rv Lathes

Eriksen Palermo and Kreta Lathes   

Eriksen Shapers

A set of catalogues is available for Eriksen lathes


If you have an Eriksen lathe, especially pre-1950, the writer would be interested to know


  Of an entirely different design and intended for even heavier duty use than the Eriksen 180-NE and 200-NE lathes, the company's EF and EFE Series were all of identical mechanical specification save for their centre heights and drive systems - the former having a 9-speed, pre-selector gearbox and motor mounted inside the cabinet stand with drive to the headstock by six equal-length V-belts - an intermediate gear within the headstock increasing the number of available speeds to eighteen. The forward and reverse drive was controlled by an electromagnetic clutch, this producing a braking effect as it switched from one direction to another. Motor contactor gear, housed inside the cabinet for the stopping and starting of the motor, was controlled by a lever on the headstock, this also serving to operate the coolant pump with each circuit provided with a red pilot light. Once the lathe was running, electrical stop, start and reverse of the EF lathes were controlled by a "third-rod" system, the operating lever being positioned in the bottom right-hand corner of the apron's front face.
EFE models also had their motor mounted inside the cabinet, this being a 4-pole, step-change type, the arrangement giving, with the aid of the headstock reduction gearing, a total of eight speeds. Motor speeds were controlled by contactors, these being engaged by push buttons mounted on a plate formed as an extension to the front, right-hand saddle wing. The makers claimed several advantages for the system including quickness of operation where, for example, at the end of a long cut or slow screwcutting feed, having changed the direction of feed of the carriage, the ability to instantly engage a faster speed to return the cutting tool back to its start position. Safety lamps indicated the various speeds and, these being interlocked, could not be simultaneously engaged. For setting work, a jog control lever was also provided. Motors recommended for both the EF and EFE lathes ranged from 10 to 15 h.p. depending upon a combination of a customer's particular requirement and the spindle speeds recommended by the makers.
  Four different centre heights were available, distributed amongst the various models as follows (the EF versions had spindle speeds appropriate to their size but all EFE range the same 56 to 1400 r.p.m.) 
8.5 inches for the 220-EF and 220-EFE (EF spindle speeds 22 to 1120 or 28 to 1400 r.p.m. respectively)
10 inches for the 250-EF and 250-EFE (EF spindle speeds 22 to 1120 or 28 to 1400 r.p.m. respectively)
12 inches for the 300-EF and 300-EFE (EF spindle speeds 14 to 710 or 18 to 900 r.p.m. respectively)
14 inches for the 350-EF and 350-EFE (EF spindle speeds 14 to 710 or 18 to 900 r.p.m. respectively)
(the numbers in the hundred referred, of course, to the equivalents in mm).
  Every model in the range was available with a choice of six bed lengths - these giving 60, 78, 98, 118, 138 and 158 inches between centres - with all having a detachable gap piece that, when removed, allowed a workpiece diameters to be turned of 26
3/8" on the 220 models; 283/4" on the 250; 33" on the 300 and 37" on the 350. On the 220 and 250 versions, the length of the gap in front of the faceplate was 9.5 inches and but 9 inches on the 300 and 350 models.
  Made from an alloyed cast iron, the 11
3/4" wide, box-section bed had its front and back walls braced by diagonal ribs and used V and flat ways - though these were not hardened, nor was this process offered as an extra. To better absorb wear, the front V had its outer surface made wider and set at a shallow angle to better absorb wear while the inner section was shorter and steeper to take tool thrust. As standard the lathe was supported on two separate cast-iron, box-type plinths joined by a sheet-metal chip and coolant tray.
Continued below:

High-resolution pictures - may be slow to open


An example of the Eriksen EF and EFE Series Lathes

Continued:
Headstocks of the EF and EFE were identical with oil-bath lubrication, hardened, ground and tooth relieved gears and a 2-inch bore, hardened and ground spindle running in high precision roller bearings - end thrust being taken by two grooved ball races. While the 220 and 250 models had a No. 4 Morse taper spindle, the others all had a No. 5. The multi-V-belt pulley, set centrally on the spindle, ran in its own ball races and was connected to the main spindle drive gear by an internal and externally splined clutch, the arrangement relieving the spindle of belt thrust and vibrations associated with the drive system. Engagement of direct drive - and through the speed-reduction intermediate gear - was by one lever, another providing a means of reversing the rotation of the leadscrew (but not the power-feed shaft, that was done on the apron) and a third for selecting a range of coarse screwcutting pitches.
  Screwcutting was by a box of the maker's own design; completely enclosed, it held hardened gears made from a high-quality steel that ran on shafts supported in ball races. All the bearings and the lower gears were lubricated by splash and the upper by a pressure pump. The box had a 10-step pitch change arrangement, together with a 4-step multiplying gear that gave a total of 40 different pitches, these doubled to 80 by use of various changewheel sets e.g. in order to cut English (Whitworth), Metric and modular pitches, a separate set of changewheels had to be mounted for each, an inconvenient arrangement - though this did ensure a better accuracy of pitch than the use of transposing gears inside the gearbox. 80 English pitches could be generated from 9/32" to 68 t.p.i., 66 metric from 0.375 to 6.8 mm pitch and 46 module from 0.125 to 12. Eighty rates of power sliding and surfacing feeds were provided, the former from 0.0014" to 0.34" per revolution of the spindle and the latter set twice as slow from 0.0007" to 0.17". Threads and feeds were selected by a rotating knob on the face of the gearbox and a surrounding reference chart.
  The apron - fitted with an oil reservoir and pump that distributed oil around the inside and also to the bed and cross-slide ways - was protected by the use of a drop-worm mechanism, this being adjustable for the load at which it automatically disengaged and allowed, no matter how high the cutting load, for both the instantaneous manual release of a feed and the use of an automatic. A handy fitting on a large lathe where, on long and slow jobs, the turner's attention might been distracted by the sight of the attractive Miss Evans from the office walking across the shop floor, was the provision of adjustable, automatic trips for both the sliding and surfacing feeds in both directions of travel - the reversal of feed direction being by a knob on the apron itself. As a safety feature, the large carriage handwheel could be disengaged when using the power longitudinal feed.
  Fitted with the usual felt wipers, the saddle was adjusted by tapered gip strips - as were the cross and tip slides, these being of quite ordinary, V-edged pattern - though the cross slide may have been fitted, as standard, with two long traverse T-slots to mount a twin-block rear toolpost. The top slide could be rotated through 90 each side of central and was fitted with a simple, triangular tool clamp - though few buyers would have opted for this, choosing instead an extra-cost, indexing 4-way toolpost or one of the recently introduced quick-set type. Both feed-screws on the compound slide rest assembly had zeroing micrometer dials which, while not huge, were of a decent size and given a non-glare, satin-chrome finish. Feed screws could be English or metric, the bronze cross-slide nut being adjustable to eliminate backlash.
  Locked to the bed by a lever-operated, eccentric cross shaft, the set-over tailstock had a No. 4 Morse taper, the centre being automatically ejected as the spindle reached its fully retracted position. Unusually for a large lathe, the casting was cut away to form a window through which the spindle's ruler engravings could be read - though there was no accompanying micrometer dial on the handwheel.
  Supplied as part of the standard equipment with each new lathe was full electrical equipment, a 4-jaw-chuck-cum-faceplate with hardened, reversible jaws, catchplate, a spare threaded chuck backplate, fixed and travelling steadies with cylindrical jaws and interchangeable tips, a single set of screwcutting changewheels, two Morse centres, screwcutting chart, an instruction manual that included a foundation chart, recommended cutting speeds and lubrication arrangements - and a set of spanners.
  Available at extra cost were a number of extras including a hydraulic copying attachment, thread-dial indicator, 4-way toolpost, handwheel-operated draw-in collet attachment, a universal milling and boring attachment, taper-turning attachment for lengths up to 16 inches, a double-type rear toolpost for parting off, quick-change toolpost with three tool holders, coolant equipment, a factory-fitted 9.5-inch diameter 3-jaw chuck, Kienzle speed and feed indicator, machine lighting, sets of turning tools, rotating centres and drill chucks for the tailstock and a magnetic filter for the headstock oil.
If you have an Eriksen lathe of this type, the writer would be interested to hear from you.


Headstocks of the EF and EFE were identical with oil-bath lubrication, hardened, ground and tooth relieved gears and a 2-inch bore, hardened and ground spindle running in high precision roller bearings - end thrust being taken by two grooved ball races. While the 220 and 250 models had a No. 4 Morse taper spindle, the others all had a No. 5. The multi-V-belt pulley, set centrally on the spindle, ran in its own ball races and was connected to the main spindle drive gear by an internal and externally splined clutch, the arrangement relieving the spindle of belt thrust and vibrations associated with the drive system.


Carriage of an EFE lathe with its 4-pole, step-change motor mounted inside the cabinet and controlled by contactors  engaged by push buttons mounted on a plate formed as an extension to the front, right-hand saddle wing.

Carriage of the standard EF lathe. This example has the full-length cross slide on which are mounted two rear toolposts for parting off and forming work.


Eriken Emato 180-NE & 200-NE Lathes   

Eriksen Palermo and Kreta Lathes   

Eriksen Shapers

A set of catalogues is available for Eriksen lathes

If you have an Eriksen lathe, especially pre-1950, the writer would be interested to know

lathes.co.uk
Eriksen EF and EFE Series Lathes
"Emato" 220-EF, 250-EF, 300-EF, 350-EF,
220-EFE, 250-EFE, 300-EFE & 350-EFE
email: tony@lathes.co.uk
Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted  Machine Tool Manuals   
Catalogues   Belts   Books  Accessories