email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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"Servo" Super-precision Co-ordinate
Drilling Machine


Founded by Francis Moseleyvn in Pasadena, California, during 1964, the first product of the  Servo Companyt was a very successful milling machine table power-feed attachment - of which over 300,000 have been sold world-wide.
Today Servo designs and manufactures a range of traditional manual machine tools and accessories including power feed attachments, milling machines, high-precision drill presses and power drawbars. Products are marketed worldwide through a distribution network of over 500 dealers.
Beautifully made, in recent years the range of micro drilling machines appears to have been trimmed down with previous models, such as the superb co-ordinate model shown here, no longer available. However, although only conventional drill presses are now listed, the range is extensive with numerous options available to satisfy a variety of specialist needs.
Unlike the more conventional precision drills such as those by Derbyshire, Levin, and Bergeon, the Servo on this page was being arranged along the lines of a miniature jig borer with a compound table driven by fine-feed screws with large zeroing (metric scale) micrometer dials locked by non-upsetting face screws. Superbly constructed, the machine is of a rare type, with the few similar models ever offered being the first incarnation, the early Wolf Jahn, a handy drill/mill that was to be steadily developed through the Leinen BFL and subsequent copies by Ultra, Excel, Sigma and BCA; more recent models of the genre including the Leinen Micro Mill and possibly the American Precise.
Able to be swivelled, the drilling head was carried on a solid steel bar fixed to a boss formed as part of a casting that could be moved up and down a vertical way machined into the face of the main column. Vertical travel of the whole head assembly was by screw-driven feed (with travel measurement by a large zeroing micrometer dial) while quill travel was by both a quick-feed handle and a micro-feed dial - travel of the latter being by a front-facing, built-in dial indicator. A built-in light unit illuminated the job (a common fitting on this class of machine) while the spindle took readily-available 8 mm watchmaker collets - two current Bergeon types for example being a direct fit. Power came from a DC variable-speed motor, with a control dial on the left hand face of the head - a round belt transmitting the drive by equal-size pulleys to the spindle.



email: tony@lathes.co.uk
Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted
Machine Tool Manuals   Catalogues   Belts   Books  Accessories

"Servo" Super-precision Co-ordinate
Drilling Machine