email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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IXION BST-23 Miller/Driller
- by Otto Häfner -
If you have a machine tool by Otto Hafner,
the writer would be interested to hear about it


Specialist manufactures of drilling, tapping, threading and automatic feed machines sold under the Ixion brand name, Otto Häfner of Hamburg, Germany, offered a compound-table to fit their heavier models -  so turning them into light-duty milling machines. However, they also made at least one proper, complete and very effective bench-top vertical milling/drilling machine, the Type BST-23.  Weighing some 342 kg, the Ixion milling and drilling was very heavily built and modelled along lines established by Taiwanese and Korean makers - whose inexpensive and now ubiquitous Mill/Drills began to appear on the market in the early 1970s. The very long-established German machine-tool distributors Hahn & Kolb also listed the machine, as did the Maxion Company - and it can occasionally be found with their branding.
With a powerful 2-speed, 3-phase motor mounted at the back, the drive was brought forwards by V-belt  from a 5-step pulley to an intermediate 5-step idler pulley and from there to the No. 3 Morse taper spindle by a 32 mm wide Poly-V belt - the standard-fit motor giving a total of 10 speeds from 120 to 2160 r.p.m. However, other specifications have been found including the BST-23PF with a choice of two ranges: 200 to 2250 r.p.m. or 100 to 1120 r.p.m. In addition other versions have been found including the BST-23TF with a 3-phase 1.5 h.p. motor that gave stepless speeds (through a system of expanding and contracting pulleys) from 125 to 1150 r.p.m. and the BST-23STPF, this having a 2-speed 1.4.2.2 h.p. motor that gave stepless changes in two ranges of 95 to 1650 r.p.m. and 140 to 2400 r.p.m. Far Eastern machines, invariably fitted with a single-phase motor, also used an intermediate pulley to give between 9 and 12 speeds with much the same range - though always with V-belts throughout. Like the Far Eastern examples, the BST-23 also had both a quick-action drilling feed for its 120 mm (4.75") travel spindle and a particularly slow and delicate worm-and-wheel driven slow feed using a full-circle handwheel.
Fitted with adjustable stops for all directions of movement, the 3 T-slot table was 610 x 240 mm (24" x 9.5") with travels of 353 mm (14") longitudinally and 165 mm (6.5") in traverse (though the maker's advertised figures were slightly less generous). Like many Swedish Arboga millers, the Ixion enjoyed the advantage of a table assembly that could be unbolted from the T-slotted base plate and used beneath other drills, or on other machine tools. Removal of the table also gave an increase in clearance beneath the spindle nose (this was normally 585 mm (23") and hence the chance to mount special vices or rig-up other imaginative or unofficial work-holding arrangements. 
Instead of the crude rack-and-pinion head-elevation mechanism used on the majority of competing examples (that allowed the head to loose its alignment during long-travel movements) the Ixion, like the rather good Korean-built "Naerok", was fitted with a bevel-box at the foot of the column and a rack bolted in place that ensured everything stayed in line during the head's 375 mm of travel Feed screws were metric and, according to a satisfied owner, the whole machine demonstrated decent rigidity and spot-on accuracy in use.


The bevel box that elevated the head. Bolted in place, the rack ensured that the head remained in alignment during long-travel rises and falls


email: tony@lathes.co.uk
Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted
Machine Tool Manuals   Catalogues   Belts   Books  Accessories

IXION BST-23 Miller/Driller
- by Otto Häfner -
If you have a machine tool by Otto Hafner,
the writer would be interested to hear about it