email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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Harrison Millers
Vertical & Die-sinking Millers   Harrison Lathes

A Handbook & Parts List is available for these machines

If a reader can provide photographs of the Harrison
horizontal miller, the writer would be pleased to hear from you




While the pure vertical and die-sinking Harrison millers are comparatively rare, the horizontal model featured on this page is relatively common and often found fitted with a well-made swivelling, internally-geared vertical head (with a hardened nose, hardened and ground gears and Timken taper roller bearings) that stepped the drive upwards and forward so increasing both the throat and maximum clearance beneath the spindle nose - as well as the maximum rpm. Unfortunately, despite these advantages (in comparison to the heads offered on competitors' machines) no quill feed was fitted - so severely limiting its usefulness.
With 15" (380 mm) of longitudinal movement, 6.5" (165 mm) in traverse and 14" (356 mm) vertically, the 8" x 30" (760 x 205 mm) table could be specified with either hand feed or an 8-speed power drive from a 1/8 hp motor-gearbox unit hung underneath its right-hand end - with ratio changes by pick-off (demountable) gears. On power-feed models an automatic stop was fitted to the table whilst, at extra cost, an auto-cycle system was available with a rapid return of 280 inches (7 metres) per minute and control by 3 bed stops giving rapid-approach, slow traverse for cutting and high-speed return; push-button switches looked after the "Start", "Stop", "Inch Forward" and "Inch Reverse" control. The handwheel on new machines could be positioned at either end of the table - depending upon the customer's whim.
The knee ran on double V slideways with a single V and a flat for the guidance of both the table and saddle.
With its hardened nose and 30 International fitting, the main spindle, ran on pre-loaded Timken taper roller bearings at the front - and ball race at the rear. The spindle-drive gearbox employed nickel-chrome molybdenum steel gears, heat treated to 65 tons, shaved and run in close mesh to minimise backlash on interrupted cuts; the gears ran on shafts supported in deep-groove ball races. A 2 hp motor, inconveniently flange-mounted within the stand provided the power - with the option of a combined clutch and brake unit controlled by a long lever (topped with a white knob in the picture). The drive was taken from motor to gearbox input shaft by twin V belts - a common source of gear rattle and vibration unless perfectly matched for length - and the speeds changed by two levers mounted on the right-hand face of the main column with a single large lever directly above them to select  high and low speed ranges. The miller could be ordered with one of two speed ranges - effected simple by altering the relative diameter of the pulleys on motor and gearbox input shaft: 45 to 1000 rpm and (probably a better choice) 67 to  1500 rpm. The vertical head speeds ranged from 84 to 1860 rpm when fitted to a machine with the slower of the two horizontal ranges - and 125 to 2800 rpm when fitted to one with the faster.
Arbors were extra and could be supplied in 1", 1.5", 22 mm or 27 mm diameters. The spacing collars were hardened and lapped on their end faces and the securing nut was fitted with a spherical seating - in an attempt to minimise distortion.
An alternative to the standard model was the "Universal" - a term often used in Britain to denote a machine with horizontal and vertical capacity and fitted with a "swivel" table. On the Harrison the table was arranged to swing through 45 degrees either side of zero with a scale engraved in 1 degree increments to aid accurate setting. In all other respects the Universal machine was identical to the standard model with the sole exception of the table power-feed motor that was fastened to the left instead of the right-hand side.
If you have one of these millers and convert it to single phase (though an inverter variable-speed drive would be much better option) it is possible to mount an ordinary "foot" motor on an angle plate and bolt that to the inside of the stand; however, because the whole assembly is so inaccessible, it is good idea to remove the capacitor from the motor (if one is fitted, it will almost certainly fail one day) and wire it into an external housing on the side of the machine where it can be replaced in a couple of minutes.
The standard miller was 57" high, 36.5" wide and 40.75" deep; it weighed approximately 1092 lbs.
For details of the Harrison Vertical and Die-sinking models click here..

The Harrison miller most commonly encountered, the standard horizontal.

Harrison "Universal" with swing table

Front elevation.

Side elevation




email: tony@lathes.co.uk
Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted
Machine Tool Manuals   Catalogues   Belts   Books  Accessories

Harrison Millers
Vertical & Die-sinking Millers   Harrison Lathes

A Handbook & Parts List is available for these machines

If a reader can provide photographs of the Harrison
horizontal miller, the writer would be pleased to hear from you