email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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HAMILTION Lathe & Miller
Maryland USA

Do you have a Hamilton machine tool, or sales literature from the Company ?
If so, the writer would very much like to hear from you.

Manufactured by the Machine Tool Division of Hamilton Associates Inc. in their own factory at 1716 Whitehead Road, Meadows Industrial Park, Baltimore, Maryland 21207, the Hamilton Lathe/Miller combination was sold from mid 1960s onwards. The concept of a combined lathe and horizontal miller had been tried as early as the latter part of the 1800s, when several of the then current high quality American Bench Lathes - Stark and Cataract amongst them - had been offered with a horizontal milling attachment built onto the left-hand end of their beds. However, the combination of a round-bed lathe and miller might well be unique - and Hamilton broke further ground in having a headstock constructed in two parts so that the whole of the upper section, complete with spindle assembly and direct-drive resilient-mount motor, could be disengaged from the base section and swung through 180 degrees. Once positioned over the permanently-mounted milling table the 3/8-inch bore, No. 1 Morse taper spindle was fitted with a horizontal milling arbor and its support - a round overarm - secured within a simple casting fastened (by only two bolts) to a flat surface machined on the top face of the headstock. The machine was of limited capacity: a 6-inch swing (3-inch centre height) and 15-inches between centres meant that only smaller work could be attempted and that inescapable problem with a round-bed lathe, the lack of a gap, meant that the owner's ambitions were further thwarted.
Driven directly by a rear-mounted 1/3 hp motor the overhung spindle pulley was fitted (like the Myford 254 lathe of later years)  with a narrow "Gates-type" belt--the aim being to get as many speeds as possible into a confined space, yet without imposing too great a load on the bearings. As a result eight speeds, from 360 to 2820 rpm were available - though, as non passed through a backgear, torque on the lowest few would have been very limited and as a consequence heavy-duty milling all but impossible.
Heavily built, the carriage could be propelled along the bed by either a rack (working through a train of reduction gears from the handwheel) or, optionally, by a hand-turned, fine-feed leadscrew assembly which operated though a clasp nut on the back of the carriage; there was no method of connecting a power feed or screwcutting to the carriage but a simple type of "chase" screwcutting arrangement (again, echoing long-established precision lathe practice) was available on the options' list.
Although of simple construction the compound slide rest appears to have been well designed with extended end brackets to carry the feed screws - by which means they were afforded a great length of travel - and a cross slide which was of the full-length, evenly-wearing type.
With only an inadequate No. 1 Morse taper and the tailstock barrel was locked by a crude and cheap arrangement (of the type usually found on inexpensive wood lathes) where a plastic-handled screw acted directly against its external surface. Two designs of tailstock were fitted: the first had a vertical face at the front, the design obviously limiting the reach of the barrel when the unit was brought up hard against the carriage when the latter was as far to the left as possible. In other words, it would have been impossible for headstock and tailstock centres to meet. It's replacement had the casting redesigned so that the front face curved forwards at the top, so allowing the centres to either touch or to be brought so close together that very short jobs could be turned between them.
For horizontal milling a single T-slot 14" x 2.75" table with a modestly-effective movements of 8 inches, 3 inches and 4.5 inches in longitudinal, traverse and vertical directions respectively was provided. On early machines the elevation of the table was by a simple and inexpensive arrangement of a handwheel surrounding the lift screw - on later models this was replaced by a much more convenient conventional screw-feed control working through bevel gears.
Despite the limitations inherent in its design the Hamilton was an ingeniously conceived and executed machine and aimed at the school and training markets rather than the home workshop buyer - though its versatility and compact dimensions would certainly make one an attractive acquisition for anybody with limited space.
In 1966 the lathe sold for $592 with a faceplate, two centres, a compound slide rest, two motor pulleys (but no motor) a belt guard, chip pan and wrench. When equipped for work with a motor and General Electric switch, a 3-jaw chuck and backplate - and the essential fine-feed attachment - the cost rose to $733. The machine was 38.5 inches long, 17 inches wide and 21 inches high; it weighed approximately 150 lbs (68 kg) complete with motor and switchgear..

Although marketed from the mid 1960s onwards the idea of a combined lathe and horizontal miller had been tried as early as the latter part of the 1800s when several of the then current high quality American Bench Lathes - Stark and Cataract amongst them - had been offered with a horizontal milling attachment built onto the left-hand end of their beds. This is an early model with a vertical face to the front of the tailstock

Constructed in two parts, the headstock had the whole of its upper section, complete with spindle assembly and direct-drive resilient-mount motor, able to be disengaged from the base and swung through 180 degrees. Once positioned over the permanently mounted milling table the 3/8-inch bore, No. 1 Morse taper spindle could be fitted with a horizontal milling arbor and its support - a round overarm - secured within a simple casting fastened (by only two bolts) to a flat surface machined on the top face of the headstock.
Table elevation was by a simple handwheel surround the lift screw - on later models this was replaced by a much more convenient  conventional screw-feed control working through bevel gears.

The overhung spindle pulley was driven directly by a rear-mounted 1/3 hp motor and, whilst this would normally have limited the number of speeds available had it been fitted with a standard V-belt pulley, the use of a narrow "Gates-type" belt meant that eight speeds, from 360 to 2820 rpm, could be squeezed into the available space without causing too great a strain on the bearings of both motor and spindle.

A later Hamilton - the tailstock improved by having a "lean-forwards" casting that allowed the centre to reach over the cross slide and so get closer to the headstock spindle

email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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HAMILTION Lathe & Miller
Maryland USA

Do you have a Hamilton machine tool, or sales literature from the Company ?
If so, the writer would very much like to hear from you.