email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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Henry Broadbent & Broadbent-Schofield Lathes
Types L8V & L10V

Manuals and catalogues for Broadbent lathes can be found here

Types C    BSB   BSC   BSD   BSH   BSN   BSV   BSX

Originally based in Sowerby Bridge, Yorkshire, Henry Broadbent Ltd. was, for decades, one of the UK's leading maker of lathes. In later years they became part of the Kerry Group and amalgamated with another Kerry-owned Company, Oldfield & Schofield to become Broadbent-Schofield Ltd. - the group having factories in Halifax, Sowerby Bridge, Mytholmroyd and Barnsley (the latter the home of Qualters & Smith, makers of metal saws, drilling machines and lathes re-branded from the makers Kerry and Harrison)
Only larger and specialised lathes were offered by Broadbent and Broadfield-Schofield including the
Types C    BSB   BSC   BSD   BSH   BSN   BSV   BSX, several "unnamed" very large and dual-spindle models - and a range of popular large-bore "oil country" models. The smallest types recorded were the early and un-named 12" and 14" and the two models covered on this page, the L8V and L10V - which, apart from their centre height (the former 8.5" and the latter 10") were identical. Between-centres capacities were 48 and 72 inches respectively - though longer beds could be provided to special order. With deep walls, the unhardened bed was cast as a box section 17.75" wide and strongly braced by diagonal ribs; a detachable gap section, able to accept work 17.75 inches in diameter and up to 11-inches thick when mounted on a faceplate, was provided as standard, The section beneath the gap, normally a point of weakness on such lathes, was strengthened by an extended headstock-end foot that reached to the half-way point of the bed's full length. V and flat ways were used, the former of the symmetrical type.
Holding gears of heat-treated, nickel-chrome steel sliding on splined shafts supported in ball bearings, the headstock was equipped with a gear-type oil pump that supplied lubricant under pressure. Bored though 3.125" the spindle, forged from high-carbon steel, ran in anti-friction bearings, the pair at the front being Timken taper rollers 4.75" in diameter and at the rear a 4" ball-journal type. The spindle nose was normally supplied as a flange to which fittings could be bolted, but as an option the makers offered an American A1-8 short-taper nose - and presumably any other fitting the customer desired. Drive came from a single-speed mounted on an easily adjusted swing plate at the rear of the bed with power transmitted to the 10-inch diameter headstock pulley through multiple V-belts; the makers also offering the option of a 4.25-inch wide flat belt. For the 8.5-inch lathe a 5 h.p. motor was supplied and for the 10-inch a 10 h.p., both running at 960 r.p.m. To control the spindle's rotation -  start, brake to a stop and instant reverse - a double-sided, multi-plate oil-immersed clutch-cum-brake unit was fitted outboard of the headstock pulley with control by a single lever just to the right of the screwcutting gearbox - though on those machines where the bed length exceeded 10 feet, a second lever was provided, pivoting from, and hence moving with, the apron. Twelve spindle speeds were provided that ranged from 17 to 500 r.p.m. on the smaller model and from 14 to 410 r.p.m. on the larger - both sets being considered rather slow even by the standards of the 1940s.
Continued below:

Continued:
Screwcutting was by an oil-bath lubricated, Norton-type quick-change box with 40 English pitches and rates of feed available that spanned 2 to 28 t.p.i. The drive was taken to a 6 t.p.i. leadscrew, in high-tensile steel, held under tension by ball-thrust bearings at each end and grasped by double clasp nuts - the makers guaranteeing a total pitch error better than 0.002" in any foot of length for the assembly. The double clasp nuts were in gun metal and a thread-dial indicator was supplied as part of the standard equipment. As the box could generate only inch pitches, the makers offering the usual set of transposing changewheels to cut metric threads. Sliding and surfacing feeds were driven by a separate power-shaft though a non-adjustable, overload slipping clutch designed to protect the drive from ham-fisted operators. On the apron the power-shaft ran through worm-and-wheel gearing, a drop-out box providing instant engagement and, of even greater importantance, very easy disengagement under the heaviest of cuts - the mechanism being engaged by a single apron-mounted lever that also selected longitudinal or traverse feeds. Control of the feed direction was by the usual headstock lever that operated internally-mounted tumbler gears.
Fastened to the saddle's left-hand wings were long sheet-steel bed guards, these covering both the flat and V-ways and able to run on past the front and back faces of the headstock by passing into tunnels. Fitted with long wings to the tailstock side, but non towards the headstock, the saddle had its cross-slide ways positioned mounted to the left of the saddle's centre line - the necessary result of the bed ways stopping at the headstock's front face. Able to be swivelled through 360, the top slide was fitted with a simple "lighthouse" toolpost or, optionally, at extra cost, an indexing 4-way type in steel. Both top and cross-feed screws were fully covered and zeroing micrometer dials fitted - of rather small (but typical-of-their-era) diameter.
Fitted with a No. 4 Morse taper spindle equipped with ball thrust washers, the tailstock could be set over for the turning of slight tapers and was secured to the bed by a pair of pads and bolts, the latter needing the attention of the well-known self-hiding spanner.
Supplied with each new lathe was a complete set of coolant equipment (with the tank formed in the left-hand section of the stand), a 16-inch faceplate for the 8.5-inch lathe, a 20-inch face plate for the 10-inch, catchplate, a three-point travelling steady, hard and soft centres and the necessary spanners, handles and an oil gun.
Extra equipment included a 9-inch 3-jaw chuck, 16-inch 4-jaw chuck, taper-turning attachment, an extra-large 28-inch faceplate for the 8.5-inch model and a 30-inch for the 10-inch, metric translation changewheels, fixed steady with three bronze fingers, a set of twelve high-speed steel turning and boring tools, 4-position indexing 4-way toolpost in steel (that could also be locked down between the settings), tailstock revolving centre and a coarse-pitch screwcutting attachment that consisted of a sub-head mounted in front of the headstock that gave speeds reduced to the extent that even threads with up to a 6-inch lead could be generated. The attachment, which reduced the between-centres capacity by 16.75 inches, also incorporated a dividing mechanism that enabled multi-start threads to be cut.
The 8.5-inch model occupied a floor space of 10' 6" by 5' and weighed around 2.65 tons,  the 10-inch occupied 12' 6" by 5' and weighed just short of 3 tons. Extra long beds on either model added 196 lbs per foot..

Taper-turning attachment

Manuals and catalogues for Broadbent lathes can be found here

Types C    BSB   BSC   BSD   BSH   BSN   BSV   BSX

Henry Broadbent & Broadbent-Schofield Lathes
Types L8V & L10V
email: tony@lathes.co.uk
Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted
Machine Tool Manuals   Catalogues   Belts   Books  Accessories