email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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Unispan Lathe Model 110
- and the "DDR-UWG" -
Wenn jeder Leser hat eine Unispan oder eine DDR-UWG, - oder irgendeine Verkaufsunterlagen über die Maschinen - die witer wäre sehr daran interessiert, von Ihnen zu hören

Unispan Page 2

Manufactured at the factory of Rheinmetall-Borsig in what was then the DDR (the former communist-controlled East German DeutscheDemikratisheRepublikan) the simple plain-turning Unispan 110 was intended, according to the makers, to be driven by an electric drill. It appears to have been introduced during 1954, at the Autumn Fair in Leipzig, and was described as the "Hobbyist lathe for the people". It was built in a Government controlled factory -  "VEB Zahnschneide-maschinenfabrik "Modul", Karl-Marx-Stadt - which translates as: "VEB Gear Cutting Machines Factory "Module ", Karl-Marx-Road" - obviously a place that had the skills necessary to produce accurate machine tools. However, preceding the Unispan had been a rather remarkable machine, for the same factory are known to have manufactured a multi-function machine tool, closely modelled on the unusual and ingenious West German Hommel UWG1 and UWG2, this copy being referred to, colloquially, as the "DDR-UWG". When set up as a lathe this had a centre height of 170 mm, took 220 mm between centres and was categorised by the manufacturer as being of the "DBF" type - this standing for Drehen, Bohren und Fräse: in English: Turning, Drilling and Milling.
As the both the general appearance and layout of the DDR-UWG and Unispan were similar the latter, with its flat-topped bed with a central slot and machined and tapped surfaces on the back and end faces a simplified, less-expensive version of the former; the various accessories were apparently listed individually, enabling an owner to retro-fit them as funds permitted. The "proper" UWG copy would have been an expensive product and almost certainly in very short supply, its use being restricted (from German reports), to state-controlled institutions and industry.
Although aimed at the beginner, and sold at a very low price, the basic Unispan was of a sensible, practical size with a centre height of 110 mm and a capacity between centres of  315 mm. The makers proclaimed: Die Unispan ist einfach und robust ausgelegt (the Unispan is designed to be simple and robust) - and indeed it was, although some might accuse the designer of producing a rather prosaic-looking machine. However, there was no scrimping on materials - the lathe weighing 60 kg and was heavily constructed with a 1000 mm long bed that was both wide and deep. Equipped with a No. 2 Morse taper socket the spindle was bored through to clear a 15 mm bar, ran in a pair of taper roller bearings and was fitted with an overhung 2-step V-pulley - this economical arrangement allowing speeds of up to 3800 r.p.m. The bed was provided with two sets of tapped holes that allowed the headstock be mounted either flush against the left-hand end or slightly towards the tailstock -  the two settings almost certainly being provided to allow the fitting of some multi-function accessory.
Like the tailstock, the carriage was aligned by a two short round bolt-on bars, placed in-line, that fitted into a slot running down the centre line of the bed. As no screwcutting or power feed was fitted, the carriage had to be propelled along the bed by hand, an overhung feedscrew, equipped with a micrometer dial and a handle at the leadscrew end, being provided. Being overhung meant that there was no support for the screw at its headstock end - however, this arrangement was common practice on many other lathes of a less-expensive kind, and no determent to satisfactory working. The saddle could be locked down by two Allen-headed bolts fitted at each side of the cross slide ways. Instead of a proper compound slide rest assembly, the lathe was fitted with single, swivelling tool slide - this being of a good width, running on V-edged ways and its top surface provided with a number of tapped holes to allow the simple, clamp-type toolpost to be located in a position that the operator found most convenient. The slide was driven by a screw that appears to have been an ordinary but fine-pitch metric type, this being fitted with a particularly well engineered and finished tapered-face zeroing micrometer dial with two concentric bands of fine knurling - the inner of the two being a screw-driven face-lock of the type that did not alter the setting when used. Engraving of divisions was crisp - though widely spaced and lacking in digits - and the cosmetics a rather attractive form of chemical blueing. The handwheel was of the two-bar type - the bars being unusually long in this case - a design that goes back to Victorian times and used occasionally by makers ever since.
Even the tailstock was of robust construction: lubricated through two ball-oilers its barrel carried a No. 2 Morse taper, so making it capable of effective drilling, though there was no micrometer dial or ruler engraving with which to gauge the travel. Unfortunately the barrel was locked by the crude means of closing down a slot cut in the casting - though at least it was a long slot, and hence far less likely to cause a crack as the spindle and its bore wore in service..

Basic Unispan 110. The makers proclaimed: Die Unispan ist einfach und robust ausgelegt

"DDR-UWG" a "DBF" type machine (Drehen, Bohren und Fräse: Turning, Drilling and Milling) and inspired by the original Hommel UWG


Rear view of bed and cross slide showing the two machined and tapped surfaces for the mounting of accessories

Equipped with a No. 2 Morse taper socket the spindle was bored through to clear a 15 mm bar, ran in a pair of taper roller bearings and was fitted with an overhung 2-step V-pulley - this economical arrangement allowing speeds of up to 3800 r.p.m.

Instead of a proper compound slide rest assembly, the lathe was fitted with single, swivelling tool slide - this being of a good width, running on V-edged ways and its top surface provided with a number of tapped holes to allow the simple clamp-type toolpost to be clamped where the operator found most convenient.

email: tony@lathes.co.uk
Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted
Manuals   Catalogues   Belts   Books  Accessories

Unispan Lathe Model 110
- and the "DDR-UWG" -
Wenn jeder Leser hat eine Unispan oder eine DDR-UWG, - oder irgendeine
Verkaufsunterlagen über die Maschinen - die witer wäre sehr daran interessiert, von Ihnen zu hören

Unispan Page 2