email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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Rosemoor Lathe


A simple plain-turning lathe - and so lacking both a speed-reducing backgear and screwcutting - the little known, seldom encountered and rather prosaic 2.25-inch centre height by 7-inch between centres Rosemoor L2 was built by the Rosemoor Mfg. of lancing, Illinois, a Company whose lathe production spanned from the mid 1940s until the late 1950s. Although Rosemoor produced other models - including the properly backgeared and screwcutting "Portable" - numbers of these must have been tiny as the robustly constructed L2 appears to be the only one that is, very occasionally, advertised.
Of considerable width for so small a lathe (but at the same time rather shallow in depth), the bed had a completely flat top (just like the Myford ML10 and Hardinge HLV) with V-edges to guide the carriage. At the headstock end a cast-in foot was used but under the tailstock a simple, rather crude folded sheet-steel support was deemed sufficient. Driven by a leadscrew, turned by a handle at the tailstock end, the carriage was topped by a single, non-swivelling tool slide fitted with a knurled-edge feed handle that lacked a micrometer dial. Unfortunately this arrangement was a serious drawback as it failed to allow for the turning of short tapers and, as both design and dimensions appear to have exclude further modification, the possibility of mounting a top slide to produce a more useful, fully-compounded assembly was ruled out.
Running in plain bearings, the headstock spindle carried just a 2-step pulley which, from its appearance, looks to have been unnecessarily wide - many lathes of a similar size managing to fit a 3-speed pulley using a 6 mm wide V-belt.
Fitted with a No. 1 Morse taper spindle with a decent travel, the tailstock could be set over slightly for the turning of tapers--but was locked to the bed's front V-way by a pair of Allen socket-headed screws protruding through its front face, an almost impossibly simple but crude solution.
Like all such simple lathes the Rosemoor L2 was, in its standard form, of limited use for model and experimental engineering - similar examples manufactured in England including the EW, Corbett "Little Jim" the aptly named Lineker & Winfield Utility, Wakefield and Super Adept, etc. However, unlike many of these (as well as those from other makers) the L2 could not be had with backgear, screwcutting or the especially desirable swivelling or compounded tool slide (in this respect the English EW was exceptionally well designed with all the upgrades simply bolting on to a basic machine). Having purchased a new lathe the Rosemoor owner would first have required a motor and then a speed-reducing countershaft unit - if the lathe had been driven lathe directly from the motor speeds would have been far too high (unless only very small diameter work was contemplated). Even then the user would have quickly discovered that, with a lack of proper gear-driven slow speeds, jobs would have been limited to those of the simplest kind. Should you have Rosemoor lathe, the writer would be very interested to hear from you..


email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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Rosemoor Lathe