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Reiniger, Gebbert & Schall
Miniature Precision Cylindrical Grinder
Factory Correspondence

Built during the 1930s, and not dissimilar in many ways to the English Jones & Shipman Model 520 of the same era, the Reiniger, Gebbert and Schall miniature precision cylindrical grinder was intended for instrument, optical and specialist toolroom operations. Built at Erlangen, but sold through the huge Ludwig Lwe organisation of Hutten Strasse, 17-20, Berlin  - a large producer of all kinds of metal-working machines - this small model complimented Lwe's own range of larger grinders.
Mounted on a massive cast-iron base, that doubled as a coolant tank, the grinder had its own self-contained drive system, carried on "overheads", and used smooth-running flat belts to turn both the wheel head and work spindle. Unlike the more complex Jones and Shipman with a power-feed table, the RGS had simple hand operation by rack-and-pinion gearing -  though the attention to detail was exclamatory, with the table stops positively secured into indents to provide an absolutely solid location. The design of the wheel head and its mounting was interesting: with only delicate work being undertaken there was no need for massive castings, instead it was possible to slide the whole assembly off its ways and instantly change it for one of another type. As an alternative just the spindle, complete with its plain bearings and stone, could be quickly removed and replaced - the outside of the bearings being spherical in shape and their mounting so designed that, as they were fitted, a degree of self-alignment was achieved that ensured absolute freedom of rotation. Just inboard of the feed-screw handwheel - and against the face of the micrometer dial -  was a stop that swung in for repetition work. Combined with this was an ingenious facility for the feed-screw nut (and hence the slide) to be moved forewords and backwards through 20mm by the large cranked lever at the side of the head.
In 1933 the total price of an equipped machine, 3210 Reichmarch, would, have purchased a new small car.

Complete, in working order and on the maker's self-contained stand.

Simple, hand-operated table . Note the stops, positively secured into indents to provide an absolutely solid location

A rear view of the wheel feed. Just inboard of the feed-screw handwheel - and against the face of the micrometer dial - can be seen a stop that was swung in for repetition work. Combined with this was an ingenious facility whereby the feed-screw nut (and hence the slide) could to be moved forewords and backwards through 20mm by the large cranked lever at the side of the head.

The wheel head assembly removed. Note the spherical bearing housings that allowed a degree of self-alignment during assembly and ensured that the spindle was free to turn with minimum resistance.  Quick-release fastenings also permitted the immediate substitution of the entire head for another of different design.

The wheelhead in place. On the left the rotating carrier and on the right the adjustable-tension support centre

The table set at an angle for taper grinding

Table removed revealing the typical V-ways used on many grinders