email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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S. Holmes (Bradford) Lathes

Holmes Lathes Page 2


Built, it is believed, until the late 1920s, Holmes lathes were manufactured by S. Holmes & Co. a Bradford-based firm (distinct from the much larger concern, Henry Holmes, of Halifax) who were also involved in making a wide range of universal and twist-drill grinders. Post Great War (1914--1918) advertisements placed during the early 1920s made a claim that  "...over 18,00 lathes. What a gigantic number! " had been made before 1914 with many, during the ensuing war, being fitted to ships or "used for more delicate tasks on range-finder and surgical instrument parts."
Holmes concentrated on smaller lathes and, in their backgeared and screwcutting range, included the "Gem", a lightly-constructed,  3.5" x 20" gap-bed machine of utterly conventional design with a hollow spindle running in adjustable tapered bronze bearings. Although produced into the 1920s, the machine dated back to 1897, and possibly earlier, with the company claiming: "It is in every corner of the Globe. It has stood the world's markets for 25 years." Its design era may be judged from the pictures below, where the tailstock is retained by a ball-ended handle beneath the bed (a feature continued on precision bench lathes for many years after 1900, but on few ordinary ones) - and the use of square-headed bolts. Another long-advertised Holmes lathe was the 3" x 18" plain-turning "Junior", yet another simple model for the amateur that had first seen the light of day in the closing years of the previous century. Looking remarkably like the mass-produced American Goodell-Pratt (which may have provided the inspiration) it was still being offered by Holmes at the 1922 Model Engineer Exhibition (staged at the Royal Horticulture Halls, London) at a discounted 2 : 5s : 0d - the usual price being 3 :10s : 0d
One feature common to screwcutting Holmes lathes (and a useful identification feature if no badge is fitted) was the way of mounting the leadscrew half-nut - this being carried in an extension to a very perfunctory apron and pushed into engagement by a shaft acted upon by  some form of eccentric turned by a handle or full-circle wheel.
Unlike many makers, who seemed either remarkably sensitive about revealing their identity - or failed to realise the opportunity for providing spares and accessories - Holmes were proud of their machines and adorned them with a neat badge in cast bronze.
If you have a lathe by S. Holmes, the writer would be interested to hear from you..

The Holmes "Gem" 3.5" x 18" gap-bed, backgeared and screwcutting lathe as manufactured from around 1897 to 1925

Looking remarkably like the mass-produced American Goodell-Pratt (which may have provided inspiration) one of many small lathes offered by Holmes was the widely-advertised 3" x 18" Junior. Offered at 2 : 5s : 0d during the 1922 Model Engineer Exhibition at the Royal Horticulture Halls, London, the usual price was 3 :10s : 0d

Early 1922 and Homes are unashamedly desperate to move stock


One feature common feature to screwcutting Holmes laths seen by the writer (and a useful identification feature if the badge is missing) was the way of mounting the leadscrew half-nut. This was carried in a simple apron, with an extension through which a shaft ran pushed by some form of eccentric turned by a handle or disc.


Holmes Lathes Page 2

S. Holmes (Bradford) Lathes
email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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