email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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lathes.co.uk
Edward Hines Lathes
Griffin Works, St. Margaret's, Norwich, England
Hines Lathes page 2

Founded in 1820, Edward Hines engaged in a variety of engineering enterprises but became best known for their range of ordinary and ornamental-turning lathes. Models made included simple, plain-turning and screwcutting types of the lighter variety to complex and very expensive ornamental-turning models. All were well-made with close attention to detail and a fine cosmetic finish; happily, a good number have survived in remarkable fine working order with, today, prices varying from very little for a simple model in poor order, to many thousands of pounds for an ornamental-turning type in perfect, original condition complete with a wide range of the essential accessories.
While Hines made many lathes, a sense of how the maker approached his business might be gauged from the details of the oddly-named "Officers" lathe, this being a plain-turning type without a speed-reducing backgear or screwcutting. It was described by Mr Edward Hines himself as: "
Unquestionably the lathe for amateurs, and after long practical experience in suiting the requirements of gentlemen who make ornamental turning their chief indoor recreation. I advise in preference to any other where ornamental work in ivory and hard wood, or light metal turning is done, and it may be fitted with an E or F pattern Slide Rest for the heavier metal turning where necessary." In addition, a most important point was made: "When required for use in India, etc., a crank handle may be attached to the crankshaft outside the standards [legs] by which a coolie can easily drive the lathe sitting on the ground. This plan answers most admirably in hot climates". By which means we can see how much the world has changed (for the better) since 1900.
With a 4.5-inch centre height, the lathe could be also ordered with a one-half increase to 5 inches and a choice of bed lengths from 42 inches to right up to 72 inches.  Beds were described by the makers as "
planed and surfaced" - the former obvious (and probably "ganged up" on a large planer with several bed castings machined simultaneously) and the latter almost certainly meaning hand scraped.
Made from hardened and ground steel, the spindle ran in bronze bearings and carried a 4-step pulley for drive by a round-leather "gut" drive - power coming from a foot-treaded flywheel fitted with four grooves for slow speeds and two, set nearer the centre, for high. To keep the belt aligned, the headstock could be slid along the bed - though it was often possible, with this arrangement, for a small amount of out-of-truth run to be tolerated.
As usual with this type of lathe, the front face of the largest headstock pulley had circles of indexing holes - in this case, five with holes totalling 180, 144, 120 112 and 96 divisions - each of these, of course, having a large number of factors that allowed almost all but prime numbers to be used. Indexing was by means of a substantial arm in spring steel that pivoted from a large boss in polished brass mounted at a point mid-way down the bed.
Support by each of the bed legs (called "standards), the flywheel spindle ran in "fine gun-metal"  bearings (bronze) fitted with bearing dust covers and removable drip plates to catch the lubricating oil. The footplate was in a hardwood and connected to a wrought-iron frame.
Carrying a hardened centre, the tailstock was fitted with a 10 t.p.i. square-section thread  to drive the spindle (called in those days a "poppet"). The tailstock casting was in one piece meaning no set-over for the turning of slight tapers.
An interesting feature of the "Officers" was the standard fitment of an overhead drive, this being supported on substantial pillars in cast-iron and consisting of a polished steel bar, running in dust-shielded bearings with the usual removable drip tray. The "Overhead" was an essential part of both ornamental and some forms of ordinary work and was intended to drive a cutter mounted in a high-speed spindle bolted into the toolpost. The Types E and F pattern slide rests referred to above were, respectively, screw and lever operated and intended for both ornamental and ordinary work; each was carried in the ordinary socket rest normally used to mount the three different sixes of T-rest supplied with each lathe.
Costing in the late 1800s between 26 : 0s : 0d and 33 ; 0s : 0d for the two standard models with beds between three and four feet long, these were - for a lathes that lacked backgear and screwcutting - relative bargains with inflation adjusted prices to 2019 of between 3400 and 4300.

High-resolution pictures - may take time to open



A similar lathe to the "Officers" but lacking the overhead and fitted with the then common rear-mounted tool board


Hines Lathes page 2

lathes.co.uk
Edward Hines Lathes
Griffin Works, St. Margaret's, Norwich, England
email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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