email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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Henry Hind & Son Lathe



Mentioned in The Engineer magazine from 1869 to 1877 (as well as the current  Grace's Guide), it is believed that the now little-known tool-making firm of Henry Hind & Son ceased trading around the beginning of 1888. Once prolific manufactures of a wide variety of machine tools including large pipe boring and special facing lathes, specially constructed wheel-boss turning and facing machines and one-off commissions, they were based at the Central Engineering Tool Works, Queen's Road, Nottingham with offices (or an accommodation address) at 62 Blackfriars Road, London, Edward Hind worked with his son Thomas William Hind, the latter listed, in 1880, as a member of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers.
Absolutely typical of its era and exhibiting no novel features, the sole known surviving Hind lathe is of absolutory conventional design with backgear and screwcutting by changewheels - the screwcutting and feeds gearbox having yet to be invented. Pointers to its antiquity including a generally light built, a bracket outboard of the left-hand spindle bearing to take end thrust, relatively coarse pitch backgears and changewheels, a narrow, lightweight apron, a gap in the bed provided by a deep, detachable section - and a tailstock with daylight beneath the spindle. However, some aspects of the lathe illustrated have been modified including, in addition to the Triumph motorcycle gearbox and clutch unit, a full-circle handwheel driving through a train of reduction gears to give a steady and much slower rate of feed to the carriage (on the original a long crank handle on the apron would have turned a shaft with a gear on the end that engaged directly with a bed-mounted rack - the feed thus being rapid and hence difficult-to control). Instead of the cross-feed screw being turned by a crank with a horn or wooden grip, an ordinary handwheel has been fitted together with a large micrometer dial. Happily the original top slide survives, as do two sets of screwcutting changewheels, a hand rest with three Ts, two sizes of faceplates and the original crank handles for the cross and carriage feeds - the latter allowing the lathe to be restored to original specification.
In plain bronze, the spindle bearings are tapered with the spindle drawn in until the clearance is correctly set - and the end thrust taken on the previously mentioned external bar mounted on posts outboard of the left-hand bearing.
Should any reader have an Hind machine tool, the writer would be interested to hear from you..

A large Hind facing lathe with a 3-stage speed reduction by combination of 2-speed backgear together with a gear cut into the inner face of a recess on the back of the faceplate

Typical of the one-off jobs manufactures by engineering shops during the 1800s - a double-headstock, twin-saddle pipe-boring lathe

A machine designed and built by Hind for the traction, stationary-engine and boiler maker Messrs. Robey & Co. of Lincoln

Spindle end thrust was taken against a bar mounted on two posts outboard of the left-hand spindle bearings


Surviving with the lathe are two sets of screwcutting changewheels, a hand rest  with
three Ts, two faceplates and the original crank handles for the cross and carriage feeds


email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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Henry Hind & Son Lathe