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Gebrüder Heinemann AG
Machine Tools
Heinemann Page 2 (of 3)   Heinemann Page 3 (of 3)   
Heinemann Shapers

Founded in 1836 as a forge, Gebrüder Heinemann Maschinenfabriken AG was based in St. Georgen, in the Black Forest and grew to become a medium-sized industrial concern, surviving until the 1990s. From around 1850, two sons of the founder, Christoph Heinrich and Jakob Heinemann took control and developed the enterprise into a small machine-tool company with 60 employees and offices in both Chemnitz and Berlin.
Until the 1880s, the Company made a wide variety of products including forged parts, small lathes, hand tools for the watchmaking trade and even individual watch and clock parts. As trade flourished, a wider variety of heavier machine tools was introduced including milling machines, shapers, planers and various sizes of both simple and complex conventional, capstan, multi-tool and production lathes - as well a number of rather more specialised types including what was known as their "eccentric" model and others for use in the optical trade.
After WW1, having lost a son in the conflict, the Heinemann family set up a foundation to educate promising engineers from poorer families at the
Grand Ducal Baden Baugewerkeschule (later to become the Baden Higher Technical Institute)  with the Foundation continuing until after the Second World War. After the latter conflict, with production machinery confiscated by the French, times were hard but, forced to start almost from scratch, the Company employed only the latest technology and, as a result, production was to boom during the 1950s. By the 1960s so great was the demand for labour that the then CEO, Hans Heinemann, even recruited workers from Spain in order to expand the Company further.
By the 1970s a new market had opened in the former Soviet Union for whole production lines but this success was not to last and in 1979 the Company was declared bankrupt for the first time.
In the early years of the 21st century the company buildings were demolished; the estate of the Heinemann family, as well as sections of the Company archives, are now owned by the Historical Society of St. Georgen.
The machines featured on this page were all current during the 1920s


An art-worked picture of the Heinemann factory as used in a maker's catalogue from the early 1920s

A postcard photograph of the Heinemann factory as it appeared during the early 1920s- almost certainly the one used for the art-work reproduction

Multi-tools lathes ready for dispatch in the early 1920s

A section of the works where radial-arm drills were used. Note the overhead line shafts


The Lathes and Planer department

Nameplate used on Gebrüder Heinemann AG
Machine Tools circa 1920s to 1940s

A typical Heinemann semi-automatic multi-tool lathe the D170 and D200. With centre heights of 170 and 200 mm respectively these lathes could take work up to 210/330 mm in diameter and up to 350/650 mm long.  Jobs were intended to be held in either a chuck or on an arbor and were frequently employed in large batches in motor and engine manufacturing plants.

Multi-tool lathe Type D200 x 600 showing front and rear toolposts turning bevel wheels .Self-acting feeds with automatic releases were provided in all directions

Semi-automatic multi-tool lathe Type D200 x 900 and 400 x 1400. With a centre height of 200 mm this pair of lathes could take work up to a diameter of 280/380 mm and 400 to 1400 mm long


Heinemann Page 2 (of 3)   Heinemann Page 3 (of 3)
   
Heinemann Shapers

Gebrüder Heinemann AG
Machine Tools

email: tony@lathes.co.uk
Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted
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