email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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The Fogg Home-made Lathe

Designed in 1919 by a Mr. B.H.Fogg, the lathe was described in the Model Engineer Magazine for 9th  March, 1922. Obviously inspired by the Round-bed Drummond, this was both a well thought-out and specified machine that incorporated backgear (missing from the Drummond) and screwcutting using 20 D.P. changewheels. With an overall length of 29 inches (740 mm), its 155/16" (390 mm) long bed had a diameter of just over 2 inches (54 mm); the centre height was 3.125" (78 mm) and it could take around 13" (330 mm) between centres. The backgear assembly was obviously designed as an extra-cost add-on, the rear gears being carried on an eccentric shaft held in bronze arms that bolted to a surface machined on the back of the headstock casting.
Carried on top of the 75 mm x 190 mm asymmetric saddle was a 103 mm by 129 mm T-slotted boring table - the slots being created by bolt on strips rather than being machined into a casting. Unfortunately, on the lathe shown below, both the original cross-slide screw handwheel and top slide are missing - the latter, judging by the rest of the specification, would almost certainly have been supplied as part of the standard equipment. The original design for the carriage included a proper compound slide rest assembly with the top-slide swivelling about a vertical post - and it is suspected that the builder would have followed the original plans but constructed the table as an accessory (there seems little point making something as limiting as a table that required an abnormally tall lantern tool post). 
Designed with an asymmetric profile (to allow it to pass the tool-holding top slide in order to support very short, between-centres work), the tailstock had a 3/4-inch (19 mm) diameter spindle with a travel of 2.6 inches (66 mm). A single locking bolt on its underside passed through a slot (allowing the operator some latitude in lining up it with the headstock) and engaged with a tapered nut that was drawn into a slot beneath the centrally located, Whitworth-form leadscrew. One wonders how many examples of the Fogg were completedů.





email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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The Fogg Home-made Lathe