email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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G. Boley F1
High-precision Watchmakers' Lathe
G.Boley Home Page   Boley F1 Page 2

Reproduction G. Boley Manuals & Sales Catalogues are available
- an especially fine example being the superb 86-page
Lathe & Watchmakers' Tools Catalogue




Although perfectly useable as a conventional watchmakers' lathe, the G.Boley F1 was really intended for specialised work involving the turning of pivots and staffs - an awkward and testing process often carried out using one hand to hold a graving tool while the other had to manipulate a hand-crank to turn the spindle.
Constructed to the highest possible mechanical standards together with an exemplary cosmetic finish, the lathe's general layout mirrored the 1940 to 1950s development for this class of WW lathe where several makers, beginning with the English Pultra and followed by IME and Leinen, stated to fit a much simpler (though more rigid) design of headstock where the drive pulley, instead of being between the bearings, was overhung on the left-hand end of the spindle. In addition, abandoning the old-fashioned separate countershaft, many of these lathes were built onto a rigid base (supported on rubber feet) that also served to hold the motor and drive system.
Designed to be exceptionally smooth running, the motor of the F1 (fitted, optionally with a rheostat for variable-speed control) was held on a pivoting plate at the rear of the 280 mm long base unit. It was arranged to drive either directly to the pulley on the end of the 8 mm bore spindle (for conventional work) or to one set lower down that turned a shaft that emerged below and to the rear of the spindle nose. On the end of the shaft was a wheel that pressed against a larger diameter "friction wheel" mounted on an eccentric shaft set below and to the front of the spindle line. To drive the main spindle and control the speed, a thumb-operated toggle lever was employed that moved the friction wheel against a housing formed around the spindle nose (a fitting described the makers as a "carrier disc"). The speed was regulated by arranging to set a light to heavy contact by a spring actuated stop-screw that bore against the front bed way. In order to prevent damage to the work, the toggle lever was fitted with a protruding arm that (when thumb pressure was released) acted under spring pressure as a brake against the carrier disc.
When used for turning staffs and pivots the lathe was not handled in a conventional way, but operated from the tailstock end (as shown below) with the operator resting both arms on the workbench. Everything was done to make his job easy as possible with, at the back of the bed, a large height-adjustable rest for his wrist (that helped steady the right hand holding the graver on the T-rest), and the left hand positioned so that the thumb rested against the toggle lever to control the spindle rotation. In addition, not only was a fold-down flap provided under the base plate to lift the headstock end of the bed, but the whole lathe could be rotated, in its housing, along the longitudinal axis.
As the bed was a conventional 50 mm centre height WW type (and the spindle arranged to take standard 8 mm Boley collets), most accessories from the maker's watchmakers' range could be employed. Amongst these were a compound slide-rest assembly, a saw bench unit, roller filing rests, standard and reinforced-head collets, mandrel faceplate with dogs, a precision 3-jaw chuck with face jaws, hollow runners for the tailstock, a universal runner with drill pin, centring pin and associated drill holders, shellac chucks, a carrier chuck with male and female points and a Jacot drum, etc. If any reader has an F1, the writer would be pleased to hear from you.
Continued:
Boley F1 Page 2

A G. Boley F1 set up for turning watch pivots. The flat plate above and parallel to the tool rest was finished in a bright but matt finish to give a clear background to jobs

For turning staffs and pivots the lathe was not handles in a conventional way, but from the tailstock end.
Particularly fine work on a watchmakers' lathe often called for the use of a magnifying eye glass. Note the raised flat lifting the headstock end of the bed

Boley F1 fitted with the maker's compound slide rest

To give the operator a better view of an awkward job, the whole lathe could be rotated on its base plate

G.Boley F1 boxed accessory kit

Maker's dust cover

A very fine example of the Boley F1 that belongs to Michael Carlson and is currently is currently for sale (November/December 2012). Michael can be contacted at: mica-des@hotmail.com

Below: a series of photographs by Jeff Forslund in the USA showing
accessories in use on his Boley Model F1 watchmaker's lathe




email: tony@lathes.co.uk
Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools for Sale & Wanted
Machine Tool Manuals   Machine Tool Catalogues   Belts   
Books   Accessories


G. Boley F1
High-precision Watchmakers' Lathe
G.Boley Home Page   Boley F1 Page 2

Reproduction G. Boley Manuals & Sales Catalogues are available
- an especially fine example being the superb 86-page
Lathe & Watchmakers' Tools Catalogue