email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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Bing (GBN) Model Lathes
- by the German toy maker Bing -

Bing or, to give the Company its full name Bing" ("Bing brothers") was a world-famous German toy company founded in 1863 in Nuremberg, Germany. The founders were two brothers, Ignaz Bing and Adolf Bing, their  "Gebrüder original products, before the enormously successful range of toys, model trains and miniature steam engines was a range simple metal kitchen utensils. Intended to compliment the various accessories offered for their extensive range of model railway equipment, these little lathe were often marked with the letters"GBM". The two lathes shown at bottom of the page both have this marking with one, having them set in a diamond frame indicating a production date of 1902 to 1907.
The first lathe shown might or might not be by Bing, the detailing and quality of construction being far in advance of others discovered. Just under 7 inches long and absolutely tiny in all its proportions (nothing being sacrificed to make handling easier), this newly discovered sub-miniature backgeared machine must surely dispose the famous ManSon and Adept from their place as the world's smallest conventional engineering lathes. However, is it a "real" production lathe - or a scale model? - if the latter it must surely be the best commercially-produced model lathe ever made As no others have turned up (and it may be that a similar machine was shown in a pre-WW2 Model Engineer magazine) the description "model" may well be accurate. However, no matter what it's origins or intended purpose, its general appearance and design features point to a machine that would have been current between approximately 1870 and 1900 (the shape of the headstock casting is so typical of that period), it even has a wooden tool tray, an item once common on larger plain lathes of this type. In the pictures below the tray should be at the back, the lathe being mounted the wrong way round on its feet.
With a relatively sophisticated backgeared headstock equipped with a faceplate-cum-chuck, one wonders if the maker of the model (of the original full-sized version) might originally have constructed a screw-feed compound slide rest - perhaps one is hidden away amongst the other forgotten items in the tool shed from where the lathe was retrieved.
Driven by a thin, round leather belt, the steel spindle almost certainly runs directly in the cast-iron of the headstock - the free graphite in which actually provides a good, long-lasting bearing surface - with oil provided through miniature, beautifully-proportioned oil cups. Power would most likely have come from a "foot-motor", a treadle-operated device with a small flywheel positioned under the workbench and once a common way of powering small machine tools in an amateur's workshop. The headstock pulley is most unusual, the three grooves having a coarse, grip-enhancing knurled finish - pointing to the fact that this was, perhaps, after all, intended to be used and not just a show piece (though, of course, this might not have been the maker's original finish, but one applied by a previous owner)..





In comparison the just post-WW2  ManSon appears almost massive….

An 81/2"-long model lathe by the German maker Bing of Nuremberg




On the left: a foot motor as sold for the equally tiny plain-turning Adept


The letters GBN set in a diamond frame indicate a production date of 1902 to 1907




Bing (GBN) Model Lathes
- by the German toy maker Bing -
email: tony@lathes.co.uk
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