email: tony@lathes.co.uk
Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted
Machine Tool Manuals   Catalogues   Belts   Books  Accessories

Aster Lathe


Although there never was a manufacturer called "Aster", the 4.75" x 20" backgeared and screwcutting machine shown here was marketed widely and with various branding. Examples surface in the United Kingdom bearings plates proclaiming George Adams and, in continental Europe and possibly Australia, as being from the Oscar Ehrlich Company- who almost certainly made the lathe.
Dating from 1895 to 1910, it was offered on various stands, the most common of which appears to have been a particularly well-designed all-cast-iron pedestal type with a built-in treadle system, a fitted compartment for the changewheels and the flywheel overhung from the left-hand face.
Of cantilever form, the wide bed should have been free from distortion when clamped to its base support and included a large-capacity gap able to turn material up to 16" in diameter. A workman-like device, the lathe was built to a useful specification that included a headstock spindle bored through to clear 0.9", tumble reverse to the leadscrew drive, backgear, split clasp nuts on the apron, a set-over tailstock with a proper barrel clamp (rather than the "split" casting then so common). One final clue to the lathe's quality, an oil reservoir and dipper rod fitted to the tailstock - so there was no excuse for not lubricating (usually with poisonous
white lead not oil) the "back centre" or "poppet"  it was then known. .



email: tony@lathes.co.uk
Home   Machine Tool Archive   Machine-tools Sale & Wanted
Machine Tool Manuals   Catalogues   Belts   Books  Accessories

Aster Lathe