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"Wolfcraft" Lathe

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At first of uncertain origin - hence its original listing in the Unknown Lathes Section, this backgeared and screwcutting lathe, with its leadscrew running down the centre line of the bed between the ways and a useful top speed of over 3000 r.p.m., is believed to be from the Netherlands. With several now found (early 2018), and of complex construction and unusual design (including a massive stand), it must have been made in some numbers. One example has been discovered with a badge on the changewheel cover proclaiming "Wolfcraft", a name that indicates it was marketed by a still-existing company, Wolfcraft, founded in the town of Remscheid by Robert Wolff in 1949. However, there are two other nameplate badges on the lathe with one saying, in English, "Made in Holland" while the other reads: Techn. Handelsonderneming Groothandel Machines Den Haag (The Hague) Holland
Although more details are awaited, it appears that the lathe is fitted with an automatic disengage to the sliding feed, a long actuating rod being supported in brackets attached to the front face of the bed. What is clear is the depth of the gapless bed, this being in the form a deep, rectangular box and machines with a rather odd design of bed ways - these being, in effect an inverted image what would normally be used. The cross slide was exceptionally long, with two T-slots machined, from the rear face, into about one-third of its length - an ideal location for mounting a rear toolpost but of no use whatsoever to hold a vertical milling slide. Of a usefully large diameter, the cross-feed micrometer dial was stain-chrome plated and could be zeroed.
Using A-section V-belts, the drive from motor to countershaft was over 2-step pulleys, and to the headstock over a cone of four - the result, including the use of backgear, giving a widely-spaced range of 12 speeds, these starting at a usefully low 35 r.p.m. and running up through 55, 80, 120, 180, 275, 400, 510, 910, 1380, 2640 and 3175 r.p.m. - the speeds and belt positions being shown on a cast-aluminium plate fastened to the top face of the front-hinged, rather short, headstock belt guard. Fitted with a quick-release lever to slacken the belt for changes of speed, the countershaft was hinged close to the rear edge of the stand and of the single bearing type with the 2-step driven pulley overhung on one side and the 4-step on the other. Drive to the leadscrew was through a tumble-reverse mechanism and conventional changewheels - though how the carriage was engaged and disengaged from the drive is not known.
Able to be set-over on its very wide base plate for the turning of slight tapers, the tailstock held a No. 2 Morse taper spindle and was provided with a cut-out in the casting through which the operator could read a ruler scale. Unfortunately the spindle clamping arrangement was of that most horrid kind, a slot closed down by a lever-operated through-bolt.
Should you know more about this lathe, have any sales literature or own one, the writer would be interested to hear from you..


The badge reads: Techn. Handelsonderneming Groothandel Machines Den Haag (The Hague) Holland



Unknown Lathes Home Page

"Woodcraft" or "TDC" Lathe
E-MAIL   tony@lathes.co.uk
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