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PALLAS and Trident V0 Millers

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Pallas "Foreign-made"

Also marketed as the "Trident", the smallest Pallas vertical miller was the Model "V0". This was a vertical-only machine, probably built from the late 1930s until the mid 1950s and used in both industry and training. The machine was based on the H.O. horizontal and, as far as the top of the knee guide, was almost identical with only the spindle speeds, table feed rates and vertical travel differing. For its intended purpose and price range this appears to have been an effective machine, although its all-belt drive system would have limited its ultimate metal-moving ability - especially when compared to the more efficient (but much more expensive) all-geared American machines offered by companies such as Cincinnati and Kearney & Trecker.
With a narrow coolant-collection trough that allowed the whole of the surface to be used as a working area, the 30" x 7" table had three 9/16" T-slots spaced 2" apart and the front face fitted with the usual slot to hold two adjustable stops. Power feed to the table was not from an independent electric motor and gearbox but, as a cost-saving measure, taken from the machine's intermediate drive shaft via a pair of interchangeable 3-step flat-belt pulleys that gave 12 feeds from 7/16" to 14" per minute - six more than the H.O. but with identical maximum and minimum rates. From the output pulley the drive passed through the usual type of universally-jointed and splined carden shaft to a (lever-controlled) worm and wheel mechanism that engaged with the feed screw under its right-hand end.   
Rather than a conventional full-circle handwheel, the table's manual feed was operated by long, cranked handles, with one fitted at each end; though giving plenty of leverage for heavier jobs this type of control lacked sensitivity of touch and would have made the application of delicate, slow cuts rather difficult. The micrometer dials were all on the small side, but their tapered faces did go some way towards making them easier to read. The table's longitudinal travel was 17-inches with 7-inches in traverse and 11-inches vertically through a telescopic screw fitted with a ball-thrust race. Instead of a separate base stand, the main column of the miller reached right to the floor, tapering from top to bottom and wide enough to give the V-edged knee guide plenty of supporting metal at each side.
Bolted to a round flange at the top of the column, the swivelling vertical head could be inclined 45 each side of upright. The spindle ran in Timken taper roller bearings, carried a No. 3 Morse taper in its nose and was moved through its 2" of travel by a handwheel working through worm-and-wheel gearing. Unfortunately there was no quick-action drilling feed. but a very large micrometer dial was fitted, presumably to make up for the lack of a micrometer-collar depth stop. The distance from spindle centre to the column's knee guide was 65/8" and from spindle nose to table 15".
Arranged at the back of the machine, the first part of the drive was by a 1 -hp motor held, on an adjustable plate, inside the base. A hinge-open, cast-iron cover guarded the complete system with the drive from the motor to an intermediate shaft by a double V-belt and from there to the spindle by a wide flat belt running over a 3-step pulley. A jockey pulley ensured a better wrap-around of the flat belt (and provided a quick and simple method of adjusting the tension), while the six spindle speeds ran from 120 to 800 r.p.m. with access to change them provided by a door on the machine's left-hand face. Unfortunately, the rather slow top speed would have limited the miller's ability to handle small-diameter cutters.
Coolant was stored in an external tank, bolted to the lower face of the machine, with a simple belt-driven geared pump to distribute the fluid.
The V0 required a floor space of 30" x 27" and a weight of approximately 1500 lbs without an electric motor..

Pallas/Trident Vo Vertical Miller as advertised in the late 1930s and 1940s

Pallas Home Page

Pallas C   Pallas H.0.   Pallas V1 Vertical   Pallas/Trident Vertical

Pallas "Foreign-made"

PALLAS and Trident V0 Millers
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